Category: Fairness

Ethnic and Gender Discrimination When Reviewing Job Resumes

They say that recruiters look at job resumes for just a few seconds, but sometimes that’s all it takes for a job applicant to be categorized and judged accordingly. Some of these categorizations may not work out in the applicant’s favor, especially when stereotypes and group biases are in play. What situations are most prone to hiring discrimination, and what can organizations do to make sure they treat all applicants fairly?

Leader Decision Making: Balancing Company Needs Versus Employee Needs

Leaders are often met with paradoxes. Sometimes they must choose between the needs of the organization and the needs of their employees. But a recent study shows that it might not be necessary to choose just one side. How can Eastern cultural values help leaders please everyone? Can leaders really satisfy company needs as well as employee needs?

When Does Job Security Affect Job Performance?

Job security has become a recurring theme after the economic downturn. It seems that nobody is completely immune to the threat of layoffs. Have you ever wondered what this does to the productivity and effectiveness of employees? What can employers do to make sure that their employees don’t become discouraged in the face of job insecurity, and instead maintain good job performance?

Evaluate Leaders

Stigma-by-Association: How Follower Characteristics Influence Evaluation of Leaders

It can be difficult to evaluate leaders. Do we judge them based on their actions, the success of the individuals in the group, or the group outcomes? Or is there some other way that we determine their effectiveness? Shocking new research shows that people may evaluate leaders based on the racial makeup of the people they are leading.

Reducing Stereotyping

Reducing Stereotyping: What You’re Doing May Not be Working

Stereotypes can be harmful, especially in a workplace. So how can organizations train employees to reduce the influence of stereotypes on their behavior? New research shows that discussing the prevalence of negative stereotypes can actually make things worse. Instead, it may be better to highlight examples of employees who do not believe in or act on stereotypes.