Category: Counter-Productive Work Behavior

Is It Lonely At the Top? The Victimization of High Performers

High Performers are defined as the group of talented employees that typically increase both team and organizational performance. Past research has shown that High Performers are likely to be victimized in the workplace by other organizational members. A new study attempts to explain the victimization of High Performers by examining the role of envy and work group identification.

Will Being an Average Performer Prevent Employee Victimization?

Could an individual’s workplace performance determine whether or not they are subjected to employee victimization? A new study finds that both high and low performers may be victimized at work, but through different forms of aggressive behavior. Because future work performance may be impaired by such treatment, there is both an individual and organizational imperative to deal with this issue.

The Connection Between Sleep Deprivation, Caffeine and Self-Control

A cup of morning coffee is a workplace tradition that dates back to before the Industrial Revolution. A new study on “The Role of Caffeine and Social Influence” suggests that coffee, sodas, and energy drinks may play an important role in helping sleep-deprived individuals by giving them the extra boost they need to exert better self-control and avoid unethical behavior.

The Impact of Envy on High Performers in the Workplace

Employees who work harder and achieve more are highly valued by employers. But all too often these high performers’ achievements and rewards attract the envy of their peers. A new study examines the role jealousy plays in workplace victimization, as well as factors that could help organizations avoid this sort of bullying altogether.

Are you being treated badly by coworkers? It might just be affecting your home life (IO Psychology)

Topic: Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Work-Life Balance, Stress Publication: Journal of Organizational Behavior (MAY 2012) Article: You cannot leave it at the office: Spillover and crossover of coworker incivility Authors: M. Ferguson Reviewed by: Alexandra Rechlin Do you have a coworker who is rude to you? Ignores you? Is condescending to

Predicting CWBs: Have We Been Measuring the Wrong Things?

Topic: Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Personality Publication: Personnel Psychology, 64, 2 (Summer 2011) Article: Reconsidering the Dispositional Basis of Counterproductive Work Behavior: The Role of Aberrant Personality Authors: Wu, J. & Lebreton, J. M. Reviewed By: Thaddeus Rad Counterproductive work behavior (CWB) remains a heavily-researched area in I-O psychology. CWBs can

Is Bad Behavior from an Employee the Consequence of an Unfulfilled Organizational Promise?

Topic: Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Fairness, Trust, Workplace Deviance
Publication: Journal of Business and Psychology (WINTER 2010)
Article: Psychological contracts and counterproductive work behaviors: employee responses to transactional and relational breach
Authors: J.M. Jensen, R.A. Opland, and A.M. Ryan
Reviewed By: Allison B. Siminovsky

What Does Organizational Tenure Really Buy You?

Topic: Citizenship Behaviors, Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Management (SEP) Article: Organizational tenure and job performance Authors: T.W.H. Ng and D.C. Feldman Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger It is often intuited that employees who remain in an organization longer gain more knowledge of their job and the organization and thus perform at a higher level than employees

One Morally Bankrupt Apple Spoils the Bunch…

Topic: Counter-Productive Work Behavior
Publication: Academy of Management Journal
Article: The normalization of deviant organizational practices: Wage arrears in Russia, 1991-98
Authors: Earle, Spicer, & Peter
Reviewed By: Katie Bachman

Illegitimate Tasks – You Want Me to do What!?

Topic: Counterproductive Work Behavior Publication: Applied Psychology: An International Review (JAN 2010) Article: Illegitimate tasks and counterproductive work behavior Authors: N.K. Semmer, F. Tschan, L.L. Meier, S. Facchin, & N. Jacobshagen Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger The research on counterproductive work behavior (CWB) suggests that it often represents a form of retaliation in