Ethnic and Gender Discrimination When Reviewing Job Resumes

Publication: Personnel Psychology (2015)
Article: Double Jeopardy Upon Resume Screening: When Achmed is Less Employable than Aisha.
Reviewed by: Andrew Morris

Job resumes are essential in making hiring decisions as they provide necessary information about applicants during the initial screening stages. However, resume screening is highly susceptible to psychological biases, and raters or screeners may rely on mental shortcuts that lead to inaccurate assessments, especially when relevant applicant information appears to be lacking. New research (Derous, Ryan & Serlie, 2015) explored how characteristics of the job and rater attitudes (ethnic prejudice, sexism) combine to influence the decisions of recruiters when limited information was provided in resumes.


Work-Family Conflict Changes How You Do Your Job

Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology, 2015
Article: Work–Family Conflict and Self-Discrepant Time Allocation at Work
Reviewed by: Ben Sher

Work-family conflict occurs when we cannot meet the demands of work and the demands of family at the same time, and instead must choose one over the other. In this study, researchers (Dahm, Glomb, Manchester, & Leroy, 2015) specifically considered work-to-family conflict, which occurs when people attempt to meet the demands of their job and sacrifice the demands of their family. While past research has shown that this may lead to harmful outcomes, this study gives us greater insight into why this happens. Interestingly, work-to-family conflict can make employees change the way they do their jobs.


Obesity in the Workplace: Discrimination Against Employees and Customers in a Retail Setting

Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology
Article: Weight isn’t selling: The insidious effects of weight stigmatization in retail settings
Reviewed by: Kayla Weaver

Obesity in the workplace continues to be a pressing issue because obesity rates continue to rise across the United States. This creates concerns for the two-thirds of the adult population that can be considered obese or overweight, as well as the organizations that employ them. In addition to the physical consequences of being overweight, heavy individuals may also be the victims of stigmatization and prejudice. Common stereotypes associated with heavy individuals purport that they are less hardworking, less conscientious, and less happy than non-heavy individuals are. Because weight is not a protected class under federal discrimination law, obese individuals may also feel that their weight affects their work experiences through both formal (i.e., overt) and informal (i.e., subtle) discrimination.


What to Expect When You’re Expecting: Pregnancy In the Workplace

Publication: Academy of Management Jour
Article: Professional image maintenance: How women navigate pregnancy in the workplace
Reviewed by: Kayla Weaver

Although women have been active participants in the workforce for decades, pregnancy in the workplace has remained a challenge. Stereotypes persist about the ability of women to be productive workers while pregnant, with possible negative ramifications for the careers of expecting mothers. In an effort to try to control her image as both employee and mother-to-be, a pregnant woman may engage in “identity management” strategies to help lessen the negative stereotypes associated with pregnancy.


Reducing Stereotyping: What You’re Doing May Not be Working

Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology
Article: Condoning Stereotyping: How Awareness of Stereotyping Prevalence Impacts Expression of Stereotypes
Reviewed by: Andrew Morris

Stereotypes are quite common, but they are not always bad. Sometimes, we can stereotype someone in a positive way, and sometimes stereotypes are helpful because they reduce the amount of critical thinking a person has to do. The danger is when stereotypes are inaccurate or negative. This can lead to discriminatory behavior in the workplace. Organizations spend large sums of money every year on reducing stereotyping with training that aims to raise awareness and minimize their negative effects. A recent study by Duguid and Thomas-Hunt (2014) investigated whether creating greater awareness of stereotyping and encouraging resistance to them was the best way of curbing their harmful effects.


Breaking the Mold: How Challenging Gender Stereotypes Reduces Bias

Publication: Leadership Quarterly
Article: Contesting gender stereotypes stimulates generalized fairness in the selection of leaders
Reviewed by: Anjali Banerjee

As the result of a recent study, researchers in the United Kingdom have some intriguing news for women interested in organizational leadership roles. Their core message is, “Don’t conform to gender stereotypes!”


A Climate for Inclusion & Diversity: Evidence that Being Inclusive Pays Off

Publication: Academy of Management Journal (December, 2013)
Article: The Benefits of Climate for Inclusion for Gender-Diverse Groups
Reviewed by: Mary Alice Crowe-Taylor, Ph.D.

Question: What does being inclusive mean for organizations?

Answer: Less conflict, less turnover, and the ability to harness the benefits of workplace diversity.


Balancing Work and Family: Global Differences and Similarities

Publication: Applied Psychology: An International Review (2013)
Article: International Perspectives on Work and Family: An Introduction to the Special Section
Reviewed by: Arlene Coelho

With a global surge in the number of women entering the work force, the need for studying the issues associated with balancing work and family has increased dramatically.

In a crisp article by authors W. J. Casper, T. D. Allen, and S. A. Y Poelmans, four papers were reviewed, which collectively provided a comprehensive understanding of the differences and similarities between work and family interactions, conflicts, and other related issues. The current paper sheds light on how culture, gender equality, and personal vs. supervisor perceptions influence the work–family balance globally.


Why Women and Minorities on the Board of Directors Need Mentors

These days almost everyone agrees on the importance of diversity. When people of different backgrounds and ways of thinking come together with a common goal, they can achieve the unthinkable and make possible the seemingly impossible. While many organizations are taking a bottom-up approach to increasing diversity at their firms, e.g. diversity campus recruiting and new hire mentoring programs, it’s at least as important that they work to promote a culture of diversity among their senior leadership as well.


Selling To Women: Why it Differs from Selling to Men

Publication: Harvard Business Review
Article: How Women Decide
Reviewed by: Susan Rosengarten

Deloitte Consulting is giving new meaning to the term “cross-selling,” a term in every consultant’s vernacular. In a nutshell, the traditional use of the word refers to the selling of additional products or solutions to existing clients.