Category: Work-Life Balance

Pregnancy In the Workplace

What to Expect When You’re Expecting: Pregnancy In the Workplace

How does she do it all? It can be challenging for women to manage identities as both employees and mothers-to-be. Sometimes stereotypes associated with pregnancy can threaten careers and lead to negative consequences. So how can women maintain their professional image once they have disclosed their pregnancy to their employers and colleagues? New research shows which strategies work best.

unethical customers

How Unethical Customers Cost Organizations Twice

If you are an employee who witnesses your customers constantly acting unethically, it might start to bother you. But did you also know that it could lead you to emotional exhaustion, work-family conflict, and other problems that affect you and your organization? Unethical behavior is difficult to stop, but how can we protect our employees from its harmful effects?

Flow at Work: Recovery Affects Whether Employees will “Be in the Zone”

Experiencing workplace flow is like “being in the zone” and it increases productivity and performance. This study found that feeling recovered impacted the experience of flow during the day, highlighting the importance of recovering from spending energy at work.

The Connection Between Exhaustion & Psychological Detachment From Work

It’s a generally accepted fact that failing to put work aside will eventually exhaust employees. A recent German study published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology reveals that exhaustion can actually lead to a lack of mental disengagement from work, especially when employees are under tight timelines and don’t have adequate breaks for leisure activities.

Employee Start Time: Does the Early Bird Get the Worm?

Most of the time, we assume that early morning individuals are perceived more positively than their late-rising counterparts due to being evaluated as more productive and responsible. A new study in the Journal of Applied Psychology specifically examines how employees’ start times relate to the perception of their work ethics and subsequent supervisor performance ratings.

Balancing Work and Family: Global Differences and Similarities

With more and more women around the world entering the work force, the need for understanding the pressures of balancing work and family life has never been greater. “International Perspectives on Work and Family” reviews four papers on the subject, providing a greater understanding of how this balance varies from culture to culture.

What’s Missing from the Research on Work-Family Balance?

Research shows that human resource management departments that allow employees more flexible options to support their work-family balance create an environment of superior job performance and lower turnover. So why are more and more employers turning away from family friendly policies? The article suggest that, in part, the fault lies with the type of research being done.

Work Life Balance: Assessing Non-Family Conflict

Work Life balance doesn’t have to mean juggling job responsibilities and responsibilities to a wife and kids. In the modern era, families and social ties take all different forms. Yet, the discussion of balanced work and personal life has largely excluded non-families- unmarried employees and employees without children. This is a mistake.

The Key to Stop Thinking About Work When You’re Poolside

In the present study, the authors examined how partners and children effect employees’ ability to stop thinking about work. They hypothesized that a romantic partner’s work-home balance plays a large role an employee’s ability to detach from their work during leisure time. However, the presence of kids may weaken the strength of this relationship.

Flex-Time: Does Your Manager Think You’re Working Hard or Hardly Working?

The present study builds theory regarding flexible work practices (FWPs). Integrating theory on signaling and attributions, the authors propose that managers interpret employees’ use of FWPs as a signal of organizational commitment, depending on whether managers make productivity or personal life attributions for employees’ FWP use.