Month: June 2013

The Key to Stop Thinking About Work When You’re Poolside

In the present study, the authors examined how partners and children effect employees’ ability to stop thinking about work. They hypothesized that a romantic partner’s work-home balance plays a large role an employee’s ability to detach from their work during leisure time. However, the presence of kids may weaken the strength of this relationship.

Ask Me Online: Benefits of a Web-Based Reference Check Process

You want to hire the best. To get superior employees, your company does its homework on each potential candidate. Unfortunately, calling references isn’t that effective. Phone conversations just don’t provide accurate, consistent data. How can you improve the process? A new survey designed by Cynthia Hedricks and her colleagues may be a step forward in solving the professional reference problem.

Keeping It Real: The Effects and Costs of Authentic Service

The authors explore if there are situations in which employees are more likely to provide authentic service. Findings indicate that workers are most authentic when they identify with the customer/task. However, there can be significant costs to complete authenticity including inappropriate customer interaction and disloyally towards the organization. A case of “bounded authenticity” may prove the most beneficial.

Flex-Time: Does Your Manager Think You’re Working Hard or Hardly Working?

The present study builds theory regarding flexible work practices (FWPs). Integrating theory on signaling and attributions, the authors propose that managers interpret employees’ use of FWPs as a signal of organizational commitment, depending on whether managers make productivity or personal life attributions for employees’ FWP use.

Responsibly Irresponsible

While the topic of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is relatively well-researched, less is known about corporate social irresponsibility (CSiR). The authors of the present study address this gap by considering the relationship between CSR and CSiR. They predict that prior CSR is positively associated with subsequent CSiR, and that leaders’ moral identity symbolization will moderate the CSR–CSiR relationship. Through an archival study of 49 firms, findings support the hypotheses.

IO Psychology – Talking about my generation: Exploration of the impact of generation on motivation

In the present study, the authors investigated whether generations differ in level of work motivation, as well as whether differences in work motivation are better explained by managerial level than by generation. Results indicate that managerial level better explains work motivation than does generation. Although the generations did differ in work motivation…