Category: *Journal of Applied Psychology

unethical customers

How Unethical Customers Cost Organizations Twice

If you are an employee who witnesses your customers constantly acting unethically, it might start to bother you. But did you also know that it could lead you to emotional exhaustion, work-family conflict, and other problems that affect you and your organization? Unethical behavior is difficult to stop, but how can we protect our employees from its harmful effects?

Intelligence Testing: Is It Always the Smartest Thing to Do?

We’ve all heard about the unparalleled ability to predict job success by using intelligence tests, but do they tell us everything we need to know? New research uses meta-analysis to explore whether intelligence can predict other kinds of work behavior that can make an organization sink or swim. They find that in some cases, personality testing actually comes out ahead.

Sleep Deprived Employees Engage in More Unethical Workplace Behavior

Sleep Deprived Employees Engage in More Unethical Workplace Behavior

So, how many cups of coffee have you had today? New research shows that ingesting caffeine actually makes it less likely that sleep deprived employees will behave unethically in the workplace. The study also uncovered the nefarious role played by co-workers acting unethically, and showed how they can make sleep deprived people do more bad things.

Employee Sleepiness

Employee Sleepiness is Harmful for the Workplace

Sleepiness is what happens when people feel a strong biological urge to sleep. Unlike fatigue, which usually occurs when becoming exhausted by hard work, sleepiness has several different causes. These causes include poor sleep quantity (not getting enough sleep), poor sleep quality (waking up often while trying to sleep or

Cognitive Abilities

Specific Cognitive Abilities Can Benefit Selection Programs

When organizations spend millions of dollars on selection programs, return on investment becomes paramount. New research shows that we can improve our ability to predict job or training success when using tests of specific cognitive abilities, as long as these abilities are aligned with the actual job requirements.

Climate Uniformity

Climate Uniformity: A New Concept with Important Organizational Outcomes

Organizational climate can be a tricky subject, especially when there are multiple distinct opinions about the quality of a workplace. So what happens when some employees feel organizational support and other employees don’t? Poor communication, heightened task-conflict, and poor performance can occur.

Reducing Stereotyping

Reducing Stereotyping: What You’re Doing May Not be Working

Stereotypes can be harmful, especially in a workplace. So how can organizations train employees to reduce the influence of stereotypes on their behavior? New research shows that discussing the prevalence of negative stereotypes can actually make things worse. Instead, it may be better to highlight examples of employees who do not believe in or act on stereotypes.

Sense of Calling Can Affect Career Decisions

How a Sense of Calling Can Affect Career Decisions

New research reveals that having a strong sense of ”calling” early on in life may help later in navigating the tension between choosing the career you want versus choosing one for financial stability and job security. When a sense of calling is stronger earlier in life, perceived ability plays a greater role than actual ability when it comes to actually pursuing a challenging career.

Abusive Supervision may have Roots in Childhood

Abusive Supervision may have Roots in Childhood

Abusive supervision is a nasty common occurrence in the modern workplace. New research shows that supervisors are more likely to be abusive if they were exposed to family-related aggression as a child, especially if the supervisors are also “ruminators”. What can organizations do about it?

Fix the Negative Relationships that Affect Team Performance

How to Fix the Negative Relationships that Affect Team Performance

Teams are used by all organizations, but they can be hurt by negative relationships that occur between team members. New research has found that organizations can encourage team members to support each other, and also design work so that team members rely on each other. These can help mitigate the negative effects caused by negative relationships.

Flow at Work: Recovery Affects Whether Employees will “Be in the Zone”

Experiencing workplace flow is like “being in the zone” and it increases productivity and performance. This study found that feeling recovered impacted the experience of flow during the day, highlighting the importance of recovering from spending energy at work.

Is It Lonely At the Top? The Victimization of High Performers

High Performers are defined as the group of talented employees that typically increase both team and organizational performance. Past research has shown that High Performers are likely to be victimized in the workplace by other organizational members. A new study attempts to explain the victimization of High Performers by examining the role of envy and work group identification.

Are Defiant Employees Causing their Bosses to be Abusive?

Forget the chicken and the egg: Which comes first, abusive managers or misbehaving employees? It’s tempting to think that employees act out only in response to bad bosses. But a new study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology interestingly finds that sometimes it’s employee defiance that causes their managers to become abusive.

Teamwork- How Team Personality Influences Individual Behaviors

Teamwork is often an unavoidable necessity in most workplaces, and crucial for productivity and competitiveness. A new study examines how team personality traits such as extroversion and agreeableness ultimately influenced individuals’ helping behaviors. Groups who ranked high on extroversion seemed to adopt cooperative norms, which influenced individual behaviors, whereas agreeableness seemed to impact only individual helping.

How Well-Connected Leaders are Improving Workplace Innovation and Creativity

How can you best foster workplace innovation and creativity in your organization? New research suggests that the key might be the width of leaders’ social networks. By working with leaders who have substantial social networks, employees are granted more resources to utilize in creative ways.

The Secret Recipe for Good Workplace Conflict

Job conflict sounds like a bad thing. But when the circumstances are right, conflict leads to an exchange of valuable information and eventually increased job satisfaction. This new study examines the conditions under which these positive outcomes occur, and provides useful directives for how leaders can harness the positive effects of workplace conflict.

Employee Start Time: Does the Early Bird Get the Worm?

Most of the time, we assume that early morning individuals are perceived more positively than their late-rising counterparts due to being evaluated as more productive and responsible. A new study in the Journal of Applied Psychology specifically examines how employees’ start times relate to the perception of their work ethics and subsequent supervisor performance ratings.

The Pitfalls of Inconsistent Leader Behavior

Can bosses rectify bad leader behavior by suddenly becoming extra nice? Research shows that this kind of inconsistency could actually be a detriment to employee health. Only employees with high self-esteem or high “quality of work life” will be able to cope with such inconsistency and benefit from the boss’s quick turnaround.

Will Being an Average Performer Prevent Employee Victimization?

Could an individual’s workplace performance determine whether or not they are subjected to employee victimization? A new study finds that both high and low performers may be victimized at work, but through different forms of aggressive behavior. Because future work performance may be impaired by such treatment, there is both an individual and organizational imperative to deal with this issue.

How to Create Successful Work Teams

Teamwork is essential to organizational success. But assembling a team that can work together effectively can make all the difference in whether a given project succeeds or fails. A new study suggests members’ individual needs play a significant role in intragroup conflict, and should be strongly considered when putting a work team together.

Make It Rain: How bad weather could be good for work productivity

When people think of rainy days, they tend to picture themselves lazing about, perhaps curled up on the sofa with a hot cup of coffee and a good book. But a new study suggests that bad weather may actually be good for workplace productivity, improving employee speed, accuracy and focus on task. The reason? There’s less distraction outside than there is on bright, sunny days.

The Connection Between Sleep Deprivation, Caffeine and Self-Control

A cup of morning coffee is a workplace tradition that dates back to before the Industrial Revolution. A new study on “The Role of Caffeine and Social Influence” suggests that coffee, sodas, and energy drinks may play an important role in helping sleep-deprived individuals by giving them the extra boost they need to exert better self-control and avoid unethical behavior.

Taking control back: Surviving an Abusive Supervisor

Abusive supervisors have become increasingly common in recent years, and can have a devastating effect on workplace morale and productivity. A new study examines how employees can maintain job performance while dealing with an abusive supervisor, and ultimately found that the individual’s personality has a more significant effect than their choice of coping strategy.

Leadership Self-Efficacy: The Key to Leaders’ Reactions to Challenging Experiences

The ability to overcome challenging experiences is widely viewed as essential to a leader’s growth. But what causes some leaders to respond negatively to challenges? A new study suggests that Leadership Self-Efficacy– the belief in one’s ability to complete tasks and achieve goals– plays a central role in determining whether leaders respond to challenges with effective engagement or avoidance.

The Impact of Envy on High Performers in the Workplace

Employees who work harder and achieve more are highly valued by employers. But all too often these high performers’ achievements and rewards attract the envy of their peers. A new study examines the role jealousy plays in workplace victimization, as well as factors that could help organizations avoid this sort of bullying altogether.

Can your personality affect how well you adapt to changes in the workplace?

In an ever-changing business world, the ability to adapt quickly to changes in the workplace is incredibly valuable to employers. A new study on “Personality and Adaptive Performance at Work” examines how emotional stability and ambition influence an employee’s ability to handle change. Ultimately, it found that personality was one of several key factors that determine how people adapt.

Why Try to “Fit” In at Work? The Importance of Work Engagement and Person-Job Fit

As organizational restructuring and downsizing lead to tougher competition for jobs, it’s become more crucial than ever for organizations to maximize each employee’s person-job fit. A new study finds that highly engaged employees tend to increase their own person-job fit by changing the physical and interpersonal attributes of their work in order to meet the needs of the position. In other words, they work harder to fit in better.

How Organizations Can Fast-Track Transitioning Leaders

Employees transitioning into leadership roles need to quickly adapt to new expectations and responsibilities– skills that often come from experience. But a new study suggests that supervisors facilitate leader development, both by showing great leadership during the training phase and by telling crucial info on areas of responsibility and reporting channels right up front.

Employee Voice: How to Find People who will Speak Up

When problems arise in the workplace, employee voice often provides the corrective feedback needed to fix them. A new study on “Doing Right Versus Getting Ahead” finds that duty-oriented employees may be more likely to speak up than achievement-oriented employees, and suggests ways that organizations can empower team players.

Organizational Attachment: An Outcome of Social Satisfaction and Relationships

Have strong toxic and weak healthy relationships in your workplace made you ready to leave? Your bonds with others at work could affect your satisfaction, commitment, and intentions to quit. If not combined with positive connections, negative ties upset workplace relationship satisfaction and harm organizational attachment. A new study offers ways to prevent workers from hitting the road by ensuring their happiness and commitment.

How Power Distance Agreement Improves Performance in the Workplace

Every leader has a different style, from unilateral to more democratic decision-making. But a new study suggests that, as long as supervisors and employees agree on the Power Distance (or disparity in control) between them, it can have positive benefits on workplace performance.

Problem Solving at Work: It’s Not What You Know, but WHO You Know

When it comes to problem solving at work, it doesn’t necessarily matter what you know as much as who you know. Employees who work directly with products or customers have first-hand experience with some of their company’s biggest issues. But many don’t have the influence or resources to solve those

Mindfulness in the Workplace

Grin and bear it. That’s what most of us do. A frustrating customer, a fight with a co-worker, even a slow computer can send blood pressure skyrocketing. We know we must smile and maintain an appropriate workplace demeanor in these situations. But wouldn’t you like to be able actually feel the calm that you project in these vexing moments? Mindfulness training can allow employees to do just that.

When Leaders Do Not Treat Employees Equally

You can’t like everyone. Even as a leader, it is difficult to treat all your employees equally. Some share your interests, have been with you for longer, or are just plain more likable. Others you don’t know as well or don’t like as much. It happens. But if you allow relationships with your subordinates to become too different from one another, job performance in your organization will suffer.

Idiosyncratic Deals: How work arrangements affect job performance

Flex-schedules, work from home, modified hours, alternate office locations – lately the news is full of debates as to whether or not idiosyncratic deals and atypical work arrangements really, well, work. A recent study suggests that not only do such idiosyncratic deals, or i-deals, work – they actually improve job performance and inspire employee gratitude.

Selection Tests and Job Performance

Does a candidate’s feelings about a company’s selection testing process affect their job performance, if hired? According to a new study, the answer to this question is: Yes. Does that mean you need to redesign your selection tests? Probably not. However, there are factors to be aware of when developing or administering a selection test.

Relationship Between Situational Demands and Job Performance

Most people are able to learn the situational demands of different environments and apply them appropriately. The job selection process, with its involved interviews and situational tests, is a peculiar and specialized kind of environment. New research suggests that an under-examined element that may come into play, not only during this part of the hiring process, but also in job performance generally.

Workplace Discrimination Against Non-Native Speakers

When we discuss a glass ceiling, we are usually thinking of women. But non-native speakers face similar workplace discrimination. Surprisingly, neither conventional racism nor anticipated problems with communication or collaboration ability are to blame. A new study explains the unexpected misperception that leads to this type of discrimination.

The Connection Between Self-Esteem and Job Satisfaction

Are you satisfied with your job? If not, the answer may be to look inward. This study includes an important note for employers regarding employee’s perception of success/failure. Fortunately, the right type of intervention may improve job satisfaction and ultimately job performance.

Effective Decision-Making: Why are Some Leaders Better at it than Others?

Effective decision-making is critical to successful leadership. However, not all decisions are created equal. Military leaders make their best decisions by taking into account the whole view of a situation, not just following rules or repeating past choices.

Outsiders are Better Negotiators than Insiders

Whether it is a billion dollar venture or a simple request between departments, doing business effectively requires myriad successful deals to be made. Ideally both parties come away happy, while your company achieves the greatest possible profit on the best possible terms. Any edge in negotiations is something to treasure.

Does a Job Furlough Affect Performance?

We all have limited amount of stress and pressure we can take. Many studies have established the strain resulting from the threat to employees’ resources that layoffs or possible income losses represent. However, how do employees handle stress when a job furlough is what’s on the table, or when an employee has, in fact, been furloughed?

How to get Promoted: Lessons from the movie Office Space

Competition for rewards can be fierce within a company. Many employees fear making too big a wave or drawing too much attention to themselves. But some research paints an opposite picture for how to get promoted. Rewards are likely to go to the employees who interact with their bosses the most. Keeping your head down and working hard may not be the best recipe for success.

Big Five Personality Factors: Are they effective for Hiring Selection?

What’s wrong with the Big Five Personality Factors? Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, and Neuroticism – for years these broad measures have been used in hiring selection. But are they too broad? It’s possible that more specific measures that directly relate to position requirements could be better indicators of job success.

Holding Leaders Accountable: Does it Work?

The authors examined accountability and how leader behavior is more likely to benefit a team when the leader’s characteristics are noticeably different from the characteristics of the group. However, findings indicate when a leader’s characteristics are similar to the group’s characteristics, accountability for actions has little effect on whether or not leaders will actually engage in team-benefiting behavior.

The Key to Stop Thinking About Work When You’re Poolside

In the present study, the authors examined how partners and children effect employees’ ability to stop thinking about work. They hypothesized that a romantic partner’s work-home balance plays a large role an employee’s ability to detach from their work during leisure time. However, the presence of kids may weaken the strength of this relationship.

Impact of Gender and Race on Charitable Giving in the Workplace

When it comes to charitable giving at work, the authors find that gender matters with women donating more than men. Alternatively, ethnicity has differing effects; finding ethnic minorities donate less money to workplace charity than do Whites, but the percentage of minorities in a work unit is positively related to workplace charity.

IO Psychology – Workplace Ambiguity: How Does it Make You Act?

In the present study, the authors draw on theories of situational strength and values, proposing that ambiguity constitutes a weak situation that strengthens the relationship between the content of employees’ values and their proactivity. Ambiguity moderated the relationship between employees’ security and prosocial values and supervisor ratings of proactivity. Findings from their first study were replicated in a laboratory experiment.

IO Psychology – At your service: Antecedents and consequences of emphasizing good service

A service climate examines employees’ perceptions of organizations’ emphasis on quality of service. There exists a lack of research explicating the antecedents, outcomes, and moderators of service climate; this study seeks to fill this void in the literature. The authors found support for service climate as a critical linkage between internal and external service parameters.

Performance Under Fire: Goal Orientation

In a study sampling students over the 15-week semester, the authors sought to identify perceptions of time pressure as a predictor of state goal orientations. Results revealed that perceptions of time pressure were negatively related to state mastery goal orientation and positively related to state performance-avoid goal orientation, and state goal orientations mediated the relationship between time pressure and performance.

Are turnover rates and organizational performance related?

In this meta-analysis between turnover rates and organizational performance, the authors examined the magnitude of the relationship and tested organization-, context-, and methods-related moderators of the relationship. Additionally, the authors concluded with future directions for the turnover literature on the basis of the findings.

Job Performance – Predictors of Mood

The authors studies employees’ positive and negative emotions from concurrent appraisals of the immediate task situation and individual differences in performance goal orientation. Hypothesized relationships were significant regarding appraisals of task importance, and those high on performance goal orientation reacted to appraisals of task importance differently than those low on performance goal orientation.

HR practices, levels of commitment, and firm performance (Human Resource Management)

In a study by Gong et al. (2009), researchers developed a dual-concern model of human resources management. The authors identified HR practices that fall into maintenance- and performance-oriented HR subsystems. Results offer improved insights into how HR provides a source of organizational and competitive advantage.

Bad Behavior At Work: Are Managers Asking For It? (IO Psychology)

Counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs) occur when employees do things that go against organizational goals. For example, stealing, bullying, unnecessary absence, swivel chair racing, beer pong in the break room, and assaulting the copy machine with a baseball bat when it is out of toner are all classified as counterproductive work behaviors.

Get Ahead by Getting Emotional (IO Psychology)

Topic: Leadership, Emotions Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2012) Article: Looking Down: The Influence of Contempt and Compassion on Emergent Leadership Categorizations Authors: S. Melwani, J.S. Mueller, J.R. Overbeck Reviewed By: Ben Sher, M.A. Do you want people to think of you as a leader?  Do you want to

With OCBs and Justice For All (IO Psychology)

Topic: Organizational Justice, Teams, Citizenship Behavior, Performance Appraisal Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2012) Article: Examining Retaliatory Responses to Justice Violations and Recovery Attempts in Teams Authors: J.S. Christian, M.S. Christian, A.S. Garza, A.P.J. Ellis Reviewed By: Ben Sher Should managers deal fairly with their employees? Well yes, of

Can Personality Become a Better Predictor of Performance? (IO Psychology)

Topic: Personality, Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2012) Article: Implicit motives, explicit traits, and task and contextual performance at work Authors: Lang, J. W. B., Zettler, I., Ewen, C., and Hulsheger, U. R. Reviewer: Neil Morelli In the world of selection, personality has often been looked at as

When Customers Attack: Verbal Aggression and Employee Performance (IO Psychology)

Topic: Job Performance, Training, Conflict Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (SEPT 2012) Article: When Customers Exhibit Verbal Aggression, Employees Pay Cognitive Costs Authors: A. Rafaeli, A. Erez, S. Ravid, R. Derfler-Rozin, D.E. Treister, R. Scheyer Reviewed By: Ben Sher What happens when customers get angry? For starters, they may yell,

Making personality tests better for selection (IO Psychology)

Topic: Personality, Selection Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (AUTUMN 2012) Article: A matter of context: A meta-analytic investigation of the relative validity of contextualized and noncontextualized personality measures Authors: J. A. Shaffer & B. E. Postlethwaite Reviewed by: Alexandra Rechlin Whether or not you agree with it, your organization likely

Can’t we just get along? Team personality and conflict (IO Psychology)

Topics: Teams, Personality, Selection Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (SEP 2012) Article: Ready to rumble: How team personality composition and task conflict interact to improve performance. Authors: Bret H. Bradley, Anthony C. Klotz, Bennett E. Postlethwaite, & Kenneth G. Brown Reviewed By: Aaron Manier Team members need to get along

Predicting Turnover? You Might Want to Measure This (IO Psychology)

Topic: Job Attitudes, Turnover Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology Article: When and How Is Job Embeddedness Predictive of Turnover? A Meta-Analytic Investigation Authors: Jiang, K., Liu, D., McKay, P. F., Lee, T. W., & Mitchell, T. R. Reviewer: Neil Morelli Have you ever had a job where you felt like

Relax! You just had vacation! (IO Psychology)

Topic: Stress, Wellness Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JUL 2012) Article: Academics’ Experiences of a Respite From Work: Effects of Self-Critical Perfectionism and Perseverative Cognition on Postrespite Well-Being Authors: Paul E. Flaxman, Julie Menard, Frank W. Bond, and Gail Kinman Reviewed By: Isaac Sabat For once, researchers and employees agree—it

Say Cheese! How Smiling at Work Can Make You Happy (IO Psychology)

Topic: Employee Satisfaction, Personality Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (SEPT 2012) Article: Why Does Service With a Smile Make Employees Happy? A Social Interaction Model Authors: E. Kim, D.J. Yoon Reviewed By: Ben Sher If your job requires you to interact with customers, it’s probably a good idea to smile. 

Why Should Managers Care about Being Fair? (Human Resource Management)

Topic: Fairness, Organizational Justice, Organizational Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology Article: Fairness at the collective level: A meta-analytic examination of the consequences and boundary conditions of organizational justice climate. Authors: Whitman, D. S., Caleo, S., Carpenter, N. C., Horner, M. T., and Bernerth, J. B. Reviewer: Neil Morelli Organizational

What You Need to Know About Ambition (IO Psychology)

Topic: Personality Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JUL 2012) Article: On the Value of Aiming High: The Causes and Consequences of Ambition Authors: T.A. Judge, J.D. Kammeyer-Mueller Reviewed By: Ben Sher Are you striving for money than Donald Trump, more cars than Jay Leno, more medals than Michael Phelps, or

Fighting Back or Playing Nice: How Employees React to Bullying Bosses

Topic: Human Resource Management Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JUL 2012) Article: Employees’ Behavioral Reactions to Supervisor Aggression: An Examination of Individual and Situational Factors Authors: M. Mitchell, M. Ambrose Reviewed By: Chrystal Ensey It’s no secret that supervisor aggression is a serious issue facing many organizations with a wide

Dangerous Jobs: A Reason to Play Hooky? (IO Psychology)

Topic: Leadership, Culture, Health & Safety Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JUL 2012) Article: Aversive workplace conditions and absenteeism: Taking referent group norms and supervisor support into account. Authors: M. Biron, P. Bamberger Reviewed By: Ben Sher Why do people play hooky from work? The stress-free paradise of a day

The Power of Imagination – A Study in Career Trajectories (IO Psychology)

Topic: Motivation Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (2012) Article: Future Work Selves: How Salient Hoped-For Identities Motivate Proactive Career Behaviors Authors: Karoline Strauss, Mark A. Griffin, Sharon K. Parker Reviewed By: Lauren A. Wood, M.S. In the recent past, organizations were primarily responsible for managing their employees’ career trajectories. However,

Integrity Tests May Have Lower Performance Validity (IO Psychology)

Topic: Selection, Measurement Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology Article: The Criterion-Related Validity of Integrity Tests: An Updated Meta-Analysis Authors: Van Iddekinge, C.H., Roth, P.L., Raymark, P.H., & Odle-Dusseau, H.N. Reviewer: Neil Morelli According to a recent meta-analysis by Van Iddekinge and colleagues, integrity tests may not be as predictive of

Proactive Performance Increases Customer Satisfaction (IO Psychology)

Topic: Culture, Self-Efficacy, Job Attitudes, Citizenship Behavior Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (MAY 2012) Article: Doing the right thing without being told: Joint effects of initiative climate and general self-efficacy on employee proactive customer service performance. Authors: S. Raub, H. Liao Reviewed By: Ben Sher In the customer service division,

Work Out at Work: Avoid Worry and Worthlessness (IO Psychology)

Topic: Burnout Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (2012) Article: Job burnout and depression: Unraveling their temporal relationship and considering the role of physical activity Authors: Toker, S., & Biron, M. Reviewed by: Larry Martinez Feeling stressed? Tired? Depressed? Burnt out at your job? Conventional wisdom would suggest that you need

The Competitive Advantage Behind Investing in Employees (Human Resource Management)

Topic: Performance, Human Resources, Culture, Business Strategy Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (2012) Article: Impact of High-Performance Work Systems on Individual- and Branch- Level Performance: Test of a Multilevel Model of Intermediate Linkages Authors: Samuel Aryee, Fred O. Walumbwa, Emmanuel Y. M. Seidu, & Lilian E. Otaye Reviewed By: Lauren

Employee embeddedness can improve retention rates (IO Psychology)

Topic: Turnover Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (online pre-publication) Article: When and how is job embeddedness predictive of turnover? A meta-analytic investigation Authors: Jiang, K., Liu, D., McKay, P. F., Lee, T. W., & Mitchell, T. R. Reviewed by: Larry Martinez Turnover is a huge concern for most organizations. The

When It Comes to Employee Health, More than an ‘Apple a Day’ is Needed (IO Psychology)

 Topic: Health & Safety, Organizational Justice, Fairness, Burnout, Stress Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (2012) Article: Perceived Unfairness and Employee Health: A Meta-Analytic Integration Authors: Robbins, Jordan M.; Ford, Michael T.; Tetrick, Lois E. Reviewed By: Lauren A. Wood, M.S. Practitioners and employers alike have expressed concern around the effects

Does Asking For Help Lead to High Performance? (IO Psychology)

Topic: Learning, Personality, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (MAR 2012) Article: The Impact of Help Seeking on Individual Task Performance: The Moderating Effect of Help Seekers’ Logics of Action Authors: D. Geller, P.A. Bamberger Reviewed By: Ben Sher Help, I need somebody! When employees get stuck trying to

What Does Your Credit Score Say About You? (IO Psychology)

Topic: Selection, Personality Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (2012) Article: An Empirical Investigation of Dispositional Antecedents and Performance- Related Outcomes of Credit Scores Authors: Bernerth, J.B., Taylor, S.G., Walker, H.J. and Whitman, D.S. Reviewer: Neil Morelli You’ve no doubt heard the catchy jingles asking you to check your credit score.

The relationship between job performance and turnover – It’s not as simple as we thought! (IO Psychology)

Topic: Job Performance, Turnover, Culture Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JAN 2012) Article: The effect of culture on the curvilinear relationship between performance and turnover Authors: Michael C. Sturman, Lian Shao, & Jan H. Katz Reviewed by: Alexandra Rechlin The relationship between job performance and turnover has long been thought

EMPOWERMENT Is Everything! What Does It Take?

Topic: Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (SEP/OCT, 2011) Article: Antecedents and Consequences of Psychological and Team Empowerment in Organizations: A Meta-Analytic Review Authors: Scott E. Seibert, Gang Wang, and Stephen H. Courtright Reviewed By: Mary Alice Crowe-Taylor, Ph.D. Are you a manager or an HR

Distracted Interviewing: The Case of Facial Scars (IO Psychology)

Topic: Interviewing, Fairness Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (MAR 2012) Article: Discrimination Against Facially Stigmatized Applicants in Interviews: An Eye-Tracking and Face-to-Face Investigation Authors: J.M. Madera, M.R. Hebl Reviewed By: Ben Sher It’s easy to imagine reasons why a job interviewer might be distracted: Workplace politics, trouble at home, unnecessarily

Employee Moods and Workplace Proactivity (IO Psychology)

Topic: Employee Satisfaction, Motivation, Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JAN 2012) Article: Fuel of the Self-Starter: How Mood Relates to Proactive Goal Regulation Authors: U.K. Bindl, S.K. Parker, P. Totterdell, G. Hagger-Johnson Reviewed By: Ben Sher What could go wrong when you are in a really bad mood? For

Jobs: What Makes the Difference for Moms After Childbirth? (IO Psychology)

Topic: Work-Life Balance, Turnover Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (SEP 2011) Article: Health and Turnover of Working Mothers After Childbirth Via the Work-Family Interface: An Analysis Across Time Authors: Dawn S. Carlson, Joseph G. Grzywacz, Merideth Ferguson and Emily M. Hunter, C. Randall Clinch and Thomas A. Arcury Reviewed By:

How Guilt Leads to Organizational Commitment (IO Psychology)

Topic: Personality, Organizational Commitment Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JAN 2012) Article: When Feeling Bad Leads to Feeling Good: Guilt-Proneness and Affective Organizational Commitment Authors: F.J. Flynn, R.L. Schaumberg Reviewed By: Ben Sher Is it good to be guilty? If you have just been accused of being a lousy tipper,

When Does Conflict Improve Team Performance? (IO Psychology)

Topic: Teams, Conflict, Culture, Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JAN 2012) Article: Reaping the Benefits of Task Conflict in Teams: The Critical Role of Team Psychological Safety Climate Authors: B.H. Bradley, B.E. Postlethwaite, A.C. Klotz, M.R. Hamdani, K.G. Brown Reviewed By: Ben Sher There’s a battle in the meeting

Beyond Sexual Harassment: The Importance of Considering Workplace Aggression (IO Psychology)

Topic: Employee Satisfaction, Sexual Harassment Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (SEP 2010) Article: Comparing Victim Attributions and Outcomes for Workplace Aggression and Sexual Harassment Authors: Hershcovis, M. S., & Barling, J. Reviewed By: Thaddeus Rada Sexual harassment is a common, negative component of organizational life that has received a good

That Seems Fair: The Impact of Changing Justice Perceptions over Time (IO Psychology)

Topic: Fairness Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JUL 2011) Article: Justice as a Dynamic Construct: Effects of Individual Trajectories on Distal Work Outcomes Authors: Hausknecht, J. P., Sturman, M. C., & Roberson, Q. M. Reviewed By: Thaddeus Rada Organizational justice continues to play a prominent role in the science and

Tips for Getting Tips (IO Psychology)

Topic: Job Performance, Personality, Training Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2011) Article: Want a Tip? Service Performance as a Function of Emotion Regulation and Extraversion Authors: N. Chi, A.A. Grandey, J.A. Diamond, K.R. Krimmel Reviewed By: Ben Sher Your restaurant server is quite the professional!  He manages a genuine,

Quantitative Evidence that the Emotional Labor in Jobs is Easier with Emotional Intelligence (IO Psychology)

Topic: Emotional Intelligence Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (SEP 2011) Article: The Primacy of Perceiving: Emotion Recognition Buffers Negative Effects of Emotional Labor Authors: Myriam N. Bechtold, Sonja Rohrmann, Irene E. De Pater, and Bianca Beersma Reviewed by: Mary Alice Crowe-Taylor, Ph.D. Are jobs that require emotional labor seemingly everywhere?

Goals for Groups (IO Psychology)

Topic: Goals, Teams, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2011) Article: The Effect of Goal Setting on Group Performance: A Meta-Analysis Authors: A. Kleingeld, H. van Mierlo, L. Arends Reviewed By: Ben Sher He shoots, he scores! No, not those kind of goals. We’re talking about workplace goals—the

Successful Strategies for Job Interviewing (IO Psychology)

Topic: Interviewing Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2011) Article: Managing and Creating an Image in the Interview: The Role of Interviewee Initial Impressions Authors: B. W. Swider, M. R. Barrick, T. B. Harris, A. C. Stoverink Reviewed By: Ben Sher When we think about job interviews, we think about