Tag: Counter-Productive Work Behavior

Workplace Incivility: Nice Employees Finish First

Workplace Incivility: Why Nice Employees Finish First!

Do you remember being told to “play nice” as a child? Well, all those years of playing nice may just pay off in the workplace! A new study shows that individuals who engage in good behavior instead of workplace incivility, are more likely to be perceived as a leader, are more frequently sought out for advice, and have better job performance. As Mother Teresa said, “Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless.”

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The Hidden Danger of Narcissistic Leaders

In recent memory, we’ve seen seemingly well-intentioned CEOs engage in unethical behavior that eventually leads to organizational ruin. Why do they do it? Don’t these executives stand to lose the most from organizational failure? After all, their lives and reputations are most intertwined with the company. Fortunately, a groundbreaking theory is beginning to make sense of this baffling situation.

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Unethical Employees May Have Been Socially-Ostracized at Work

Unethical employees can be a major problem at work, but not good old co-worker Steve; He’s usually a pretty decent guy. However, today Steve is faced with a moral dilemma: Should he steal Amy’s tasty turkey sandwich that is sitting unattended in the fridge? New research shows that because Steve was just excluded from an interesting lunch-time discussion, it might make him more likely to commit the crime. But why?

Being Fair

The Dark Side of Procedural Justice: When Being Fair Isn’t Enough

We tend to think that fairness in the workplace is always good, but new research has found a situation in which fairness can actually cause trouble between employees. In fact, it may be leading envious employees to act out in counter-productive ways. How does this happen, and how can organizations best prepare themselves to deal with the problem?

Intelligence Testing: Is It Always the Smartest Thing to Do?

We’ve all heard about the unparalleled ability to predict job success by using intelligence tests, but do they tell us everything we need to know? New research uses meta-analysis to explore whether intelligence can predict other kinds of work behavior that can make an organization sink or swim. They find that in some cases, personality testing actually comes out ahead.

Sleep Deprived Employees Engage in More Unethical Workplace Behavior

Sleep Deprived Employees Engage in More Unethical Workplace Behavior

So, how many cups of coffee have you had today? New research shows that ingesting caffeine actually makes it less likely that sleep deprived employees will behave unethically in the workplace. The study also uncovered the nefarious role played by co-workers acting unethically, and showed how they can make sleep deprived people do more bad things.

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Workplace Bullying: Corrupt and Harmful to Organizations

We tend to think of bullying as something that happens to kids at school, but a new review discusses the prevalence of workplace bullying, as well as its alarming harmful effects. Researchers are starting to consider bullying another form of organizational corruption.

Abusive Supervision may have Roots in Childhood

Abusive Supervision may have Roots in Childhood

Abusive supervision is a nasty common occurrence in the modern workplace. New research shows that supervisors are more likely to be abusive if they were exposed to family-related aggression as a child, especially if the supervisors are also “ruminators”. What can organizations do about it?

Is It Lonely At the Top? The Victimization of High Performers

High Performers are defined as the group of talented employees that typically increase both team and organizational performance. Past research has shown that High Performers are likely to be victimized in the workplace by other organizational members. A new study attempts to explain the victimization of High Performers by examining the role of envy and work group identification.

Are Defiant Employees Causing their Bosses to be Abusive?

Forget the chicken and the egg: Which comes first, abusive managers or misbehaving employees? It’s tempting to think that employees act out only in response to bad bosses. But a new study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology interestingly finds that sometimes it’s employee defiance that causes their managers to become abusive.

Social Media at Work: Implications for Productivity

The use of social media at work is becoming increasingly common. A recent study done to develop a questionnaire for measuring good and bad social media behaviors revealed that, in addition to harmful social media behaviors being related to decreased performance, the beneficial behaviors seemed to have no significant relationship to performance. In short, no particular increase in performance output was detected.

The Negative Effects of Knowledge Hiding on Organizational Trust and Creativity

A new study finds that hiding information from colleagues has deep implications for any organization. Individuals who hide pertinent information will soon find their actions reciprocated, ultimately creating a distrust loop. In the end, this cycle limits creativity within an organization, but having the correct organizational environment can help stimulate creativity and reduce an employee’s desire to hide information with colleagues.

Will Being an Average Performer Prevent Employee Victimization?

Could an individual’s workplace performance determine whether or not they are subjected to employee victimization? A new study finds that both high and low performers may be victimized at work, but through different forms of aggressive behavior. Because future work performance may be impaired by such treatment, there is both an individual and organizational imperative to deal with this issue.

The Connection Between Sleep Deprivation, Caffeine and Self-Control

A cup of morning coffee is a workplace tradition that dates back to before the Industrial Revolution. A new study on “The Role of Caffeine and Social Influence” suggests that coffee, sodas, and energy drinks may play an important role in helping sleep-deprived individuals by giving them the extra boost they need to exert better self-control and avoid unethical behavior.

Taking control back: Surviving an Abusive Supervisor

Abusive supervisors have become increasingly common in recent years, and can have a devastating effect on workplace morale and productivity. A new study examines how employees can maintain job performance while dealing with an abusive supervisor, and ultimately found that the individual’s personality has a more significant effect than their choice of coping strategy.

The Impact of Envy on High Performers in the Workplace

Employees who work harder and achieve more are highly valued by employers. But all too often these high performers’ achievements and rewards attract the envy of their peers. A new study examines the role jealousy plays in workplace victimization, as well as factors that could help organizations avoid this sort of bullying altogether.

How Service Employees React to Mistreatment by Rude Customers

We’ve all seen employees in the service industry subjected to abusive behavior by rude customers. A new study by Ruodan Shao and Daniel P. Skarlicki finds that employees’ reactions to mistreatment by customers varies in individualistic and collectivistic cultures. It also suggests several solutions for dealing with the stress such rude treatment often causes.

Consequences of Abusive Supervision

Schools have adopted a zero-tolerance policy towards bullying. But what about bullying in the workplace? A new study on abusive supervision suggests that supervisor aggression can create emotional exhaustion among employees, ultimately leading to feedback avoidance.

When Powerful Leaders Hinder Team Performance

Have you ever had a boss you would swear called meetings just to hear the sound of their own voice? Some leaders are powerful and know it. Unfortunately, this sense of power can give leaders bad habits, such as always talking and never listening. A new study outlines a few simple steps to keep these powerful presences in your organization from hampering team performance and impeding communication.

Positive Affect: A Balanced Approach to Workplace Implementation

A stressful workplace environment is bad for business. Workers lose creativity, motivation, and stop taking initiative. Eventually, they quit. But what happens when there’s too much of a good thing? When positive affect generators such as team building, stress busting, and social networking become too common, it is actually possible for workers to become too pleased.

Goals vs. the Ostrich: When Employees Refuse to Track Progress

No news is good news, right? Not when it comes to job performance and project management. Knowing where you stand helps you remain focused on where you have to go, but some employees would rather stick their heads in the sand, avoiding all progress tracking. How do you deal with an employee who just will not monitor their own progress?

Bad Behavior At Work: Are Managers Asking For It? (IO Psychology)

Counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs) occur when employees do things that go against organizational goals. For example, stealing, bullying, unnecessary absence, swivel chair racing, beer pong in the break room, and assaulting the copy machine with a baseball bat when it is out of toner are all classified as counterproductive work behaviors.

Should Leaders Care About the Work or the Workers? How About Both?!

Topic: Leadership, Counter-Productive Work Behavior Publication: Journal of Organizational Behavior (in press) Article: Effects of Leadership Consideration and Structure on Employee Perceptions of Justice and Counterproductive Work Behavior Authors: Brian C. Holtz & Crystal M. Harold Reviewed By: Thaddeus Rada Although research on a variety of leadership “types,” such as

Are you being treated badly by coworkers? It might just be affecting your home life (IO Psychology)

Topic: Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Work-Life Balance, Stress Publication: Journal of Organizational Behavior (MAY 2012) Article: You cannot leave it at the office: Spillover and crossover of coworker incivility Authors: M. Ferguson Reviewed by: Alexandra Rechlin Do you have a coworker who is rude to you? Ignores you? Is condescending to

Predicting someone’s propensity to morally disengage (IO Psychology)

Topic: Assessment, Personality, Ethics, Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Workplace Deviance Publication: Personnel Psychology (SPRING 2012) Article: Why employees do bad things: Moral disengagement and unethical organizational behavior Authors: Celia Moore, James R. Detert, Linda Klebe Treviño, Vicki L. Baker, & David M. Mayer Reviewed by: Alexandra Rechlin Organizations obviously want their

Predicting CWBs: Have We Been Measuring the Wrong Things?

Topic: Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Personality Publication: Personnel Psychology, 64, 2 (Summer 2011) Article: Reconsidering the Dispositional Basis of Counterproductive Work Behavior: The Role of Aberrant Personality Authors: Wu, J. & Lebreton, J. M. Reviewed By: Thaddeus Rad Counterproductive work behavior (CWB) remains a heavily-researched area in I-O psychology. CWBs can

Co-ruminating with work friends by the water cooler?

Topic: Gender
Publication: Journal of Business and Psychology (MAR 2011)
Article: Co-Rumination in the Workplace: Adjustment Trade-offs for Men and Women
Who Engage in Excessive Discussion of Workplace Problems.
Authors: D.L. Haggard, C. Robert, A.J. Rose
Reviewed By: Rebecca Eckart

Is Bad Behavior from an Employee the Consequence of an Unfulfilled Organizational Promise?

Topic: Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Fairness, Trust, Workplace Deviance
Publication: Journal of Business and Psychology (WINTER 2010)
Article: Psychological contracts and counterproductive work behaviors: employee responses to transactional and relational breach
Authors: J.M. Jensen, R.A. Opland, and A.M. Ryan
Reviewed By: Allison B. Siminovsky

What Does Organizational Tenure Really Buy You?

Topic: Citizenship Behaviors, Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Management (SEP) Article: Organizational tenure and job performance Authors: T.W.H. Ng and D.C. Feldman Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger It is often intuited that employees who remain in an organization longer gain more knowledge of their job and the organization and thus perform at a higher level than employees

One Morally Bankrupt Apple Spoils the Bunch…

Topic: Counter-Productive Work Behavior
Publication: Academy of Management Journal
Article: The normalization of deviant organizational practices: Wage arrears in Russia, 1991-98
Authors: Earle, Spicer, & Peter
Reviewed By: Katie Bachman

How Positive Feedback Helps Prevent Negative Outcomes

Topic: Feedback Publication: Applied Psychology: An International Review (APR09) Article: Consequences of positive and negative feedback: The impact on emotions and extra-role behaviors Authors: F. D. Belschak, D. N. Den Hartog Reviewed By: Sarah Teague Two recent studies conducted by Belschak and Den Hartog (2009) investigated the impact of positive and

Illegitimate Tasks – You Want Me to do What!?

Topic: Counterproductive Work Behavior Publication: Applied Psychology: An International Review (JAN 2010) Article: Illegitimate tasks and counterproductive work behavior Authors: N.K. Semmer, F. Tschan, L.L. Meier, S. Facchin, & N. Jacobshagen Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger The research on counterproductive work behavior (CWB) suggests that it often represents a form of retaliation in

The Golden Rule: Be Sweet and No One Gets Hurt

Topic: Counterproductive Work Behavior Publication: Personnel Psychology (SUMMER 2009) Article: The Relations of Daily Counterproductive Workplace Behavior with Emotions, Situational Antecedents, and Personality Moderators: A Diary Study in Hong Kong Authors: J. Yang, J.M. Diefendorff Reviewed By: Katie Bachman When workers are unhappy with their treatment at work, they tend to

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly of Stress at Work

Topic: Citizenship Behavior, Counterproductive Work Behaviors Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2009) Article: Can “good” stressors spark “bad” behaviors? The mediating role of emotions in links of challenge and hindrance stressors with citizenship and counter productive behaviors Authors: J.B. Rodell, T.A. Judge Reviewed By: Katie Bachman Research suggests that stress

Explanations Can Leave a Sweet Taste in Job Applicants’ Mouths

Topic: Organizational Justice, Selection Publication: International Journal of Selection and Assessment (DEC 2009) Article: Effects of explanations on applicant reactions: A meta-analytic review Authors: D.M. Truxillo, T.E. Bodner, M. Bertolino, T.N. Bauer, and C.A. Yonce Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger Oftentimes, job applicants run a gauntlet of various selection tests, assessments, and

Tell Your Boss to Get Off the Web and Back to Work

Topic: Citizenship, Counter-Productive Work Behaior Publication: CyberPsychology & Behavior Article:  On Cyberslacking: Workplace Status and Personal Internet Use at Work.   Blogger: Lit Digger Does your boss check his personal email or read websites featuring non-work-related information (such as the news or online shopping) more often than you? It’s likely according to the findings of Garrett and Danziger (2008). By conducting a phone survey (n=1,024), these researchers found