Tag: workplace deviance

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Ethics in the Workplace: Anxious Employees May Cause Trouble

Employees are faced with anxiety producing events every day: securing new clients, important meetings with bosses, interacting with difficult coworkers. Yet, these events can lead to more than just uncomfortable feelings, they may also affect ethics in the workplace. Recent research shows that anxious employees may be more likely to engage in unethical behavior than employees in a relaxed state.

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Unethical Employees May Have Been Socially-Ostracized at Work

Unethical employees can be a major problem at work, but not good old co-worker Steve; He’s usually a pretty decent guy. However, today Steve is faced with a moral dilemma: Should he steal Amy’s tasty turkey sandwich that is sitting unattended in the fridge? New research shows that because Steve was just excluded from an interesting lunch-time discussion, it might make him more likely to commit the crime. But why?

Pre-employment Testing

Pre-Employment Testing Done Right: Does it Really Reduce Cheating?

Bob is a job applicant taking on online intelligence test as part of his pre-employment screening. Some of the questions are pretty hard, but he can simply Google the answers and get them right. Does he cheat? New research shows how organizations can help design these types of tests to make sure that cheating is less likely to occur.

unethical customers

How Unethical Customers Cost Organizations Twice

If you are an employee who witnesses your customers constantly acting unethically, it might start to bother you. But did you also know that it could lead you to emotional exhaustion, work-family conflict, and other problems that affect you and your organization? Unethical behavior is difficult to stop, but how can we protect our employees from its harmful effects?

The Impact of Envy on High Performers in the Workplace

Employees who work harder and achieve more are highly valued by employers. But all too often these high performers’ achievements and rewards attract the envy of their peers. A new study examines the role jealousy plays in workplace victimization, as well as factors that could help organizations avoid this sort of bullying altogether.