Month: July 2014

Employee Start Time: Does the Early Bird Get the Worm?

Most of the time, we assume that early morning individuals are perceived more positively than their late-rising counterparts due to being evaluated as more productive and responsible. A new study in the Journal of Applied Psychology specifically examines how employees’ start times relate to the perception of their work ethics and subsequent supervisor performance ratings.

Are You Managing and Keeping Your Star Performers?

In the evolving workforce of the 21st century, there is a tendency for star performers to produce a disproportionate amount of output compared to the average performer. Despite this trend there has been very little shift in how we treat and manage star performers, often treating and paying them the same as average performers. The result is higher turnover among stars. How important are star performers and what can we do to better manage and retain them?

Is More Status Inherently Better? Investigating Performance After Status Loss

Is having higher status always the best thing for greater performance outcomes? A new study examines how status loss affects the performance of both high and low status individuals. Researchers found that those with higher status are more likely to experience decreases in the quality of their performance, possibly due to the threat to their self-concept brought about by losing status.

The Pitfalls of Inconsistent Leader Behavior

Can bosses rectify bad leader behavior by suddenly becoming extra nice? Research shows that this kind of inconsistency could actually be a detriment to employee health. Only employees with high self-esteem or high “quality of work life” will be able to cope with such inconsistency and benefit from the boss’s quick turnaround.