Tag: stress

Working Abroad- How to Help Employees Weather the Storm

Many employees are being sent on overseas assignments these days. Some start off working well in foreign cultures, but don’t maintain their adjustment levels over time, while others never perform as well as they did back home. A new study shows that initial motivation and psychological empowerment are crucial to the process, but interact with different kinds of stressors to affect performance in both positive and negative ways.

How Service Employees React to Mistreatment by Rude Customers

We’ve all seen employees in the service industry subjected to abusive behavior by rude customers. A new study by Ruodan Shao and Daniel P. Skarlicki finds that employees’ reactions to mistreatment by customers varies in individualistic and collectivistic cultures. It also suggests several solutions for dealing with the stress such rude treatment often causes.

Workplace Blues: Employees feel stressed, underpaid, and unheard

The first step is solving problems in your workforce is understanding what those problems are. No amount of process improvement, rewards systems, or management support will suffice, without an accurate sense of your company’s climate and employee satisfaction. So, how are your employees feeling? Well, according to the American Psychological Association, they might be unhappy, especially if they are women.

Shame on you!

Bohns and Flynn assert that guilt, as compared to shame, is a more adaptive affective reaction to setbacks in the workplace.  In response to a setback or failure, an employee, among other things, can feel shame or can feel guilt.  With shame, the person may continue to feel humiliated and

Relax! You just had vacation! (IO Psychology)

Topic: Stress, Wellness Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JUL 2012) Article: Academics’ Experiences of a Respite From Work: Effects of Self-Critical Perfectionism and Perseverative Cognition on Postrespite Well-Being Authors: Paul E. Flaxman, Julie Menard, Frank W. Bond, and Gail Kinman Reviewed By: Isaac Sabat For once, researchers and employees agree—it