Category: Job Performance

Organizational Socialization Tactics to Help Newcomers Adjust

Using Organizational Socialization Tactics to Help Newcomers Adjust

New research shows that certain organizational socialization tactics can help reduce newcomer anxiety and foster a greater sense of competence on the job. When socialization tactics enable the building of trusting relationships, organizations can facilitate greater organizational commitment among newcomers.

Social Media at Work: Implications for Productivity

The use of social media at work is becoming increasingly common. A recent study done to develop a questionnaire for measuring good and bad social media behaviors revealed that, in addition to harmful social media behaviors being related to decreased performance, the beneficial behaviors seemed to have no significant relationship to performance. In short, no particular increase in performance output was detected.

Employee Start Time: Does the Early Bird Get the Worm?

Most of the time, we assume that early morning individuals are perceived more positively than their late-rising counterparts due to being evaluated as more productive and responsible. A new study in the Journal of Applied Psychology specifically examines how employees’ start times relate to the perception of their work ethics and subsequent supervisor performance ratings.

Are You Managing and Keeping Your Star Performers?

In the evolving workforce of the 21st century, there is a tendency for star performers to produce a disproportionate amount of output compared to the average performer. Despite this trend there has been very little shift in how we treat and manage star performers, often treating and paying them the same as average performers. The result is higher turnover among stars. How important are star performers and what can we do to better manage and retain them?

Is More Status Inherently Better? Investigating Performance After Status Loss

Is having higher status always the best thing for greater performance outcomes? A new study examines how status loss affects the performance of both high and low status individuals. Researchers found that those with higher status are more likely to experience decreases in the quality of their performance, possibly due to the threat to their self-concept brought about by losing status.

Working Abroad- How to Help Employees Weather the Storm

Many employees are being sent on overseas assignments these days. Some start off working well in foreign cultures, but don’t maintain their adjustment levels over time, while others never perform as well as they did back home. A new study shows that initial motivation and psychological empowerment are crucial to the process, but interact with different kinds of stressors to affect performance in both positive and negative ways.

Will Being an Average Performer Prevent Employee Victimization?

Could an individual’s workplace performance determine whether or not they are subjected to employee victimization? A new study finds that both high and low performers may be victimized at work, but through different forms of aggressive behavior. Because future work performance may be impaired by such treatment, there is both an individual and organizational imperative to deal with this issue.

Make It Rain: How bad weather could be good for work productivity

When people think of rainy days, they tend to picture themselves lazing about, perhaps curled up on the sofa with a hot cup of coffee and a good book. But a new study suggests that bad weather may actually be good for workplace productivity, improving employee speed, accuracy and focus on task. The reason? There’s less distraction outside than there is on bright, sunny days.

Taking control back: Surviving an Abusive Supervisor

Abusive supervisors have become increasingly common in recent years, and can have a devastating effect on workplace morale and productivity. A new study examines how employees can maintain job performance while dealing with an abusive supervisor, and ultimately found that the individual’s personality has a more significant effect than their choice of coping strategy.

Thriving At Work Rather Than Just Going Through the Motions

Do you want to excel at what you do, instead of just going through the motions? A new study on thriving at work finds that employees who are more hopeful, efficacious, resilient, optimistic, and have supportive supervisors are more likely to succeed, which in turn is related to greater self-development and work performance.