Month: September 2014

Avoiding Adverse Impact: Selection Procedures That Increase Organizational Diversity

Cognitive testing has long been used for selection procedures in order to ensure hiring suitable applicants. But this method has also discriminated against minority groups, ultimately affecting organizational diversity. A recent study investigated how sophisticated weighing techniques for specific abilities related to a job could increase diversity while still ensuring the right hire.

Is It Lonely At the Top? The Victimization of High Performers

High Performers are defined as the group of talented employees that typically increase both team and organizational performance. Past research has shown that High Performers are likely to be victimized in the workplace by other organizational members. A new study attempts to explain the victimization of High Performers by examining the role of envy and work group identification.

Self-Reflective Job Titles: A Cost-Effective Way to Reduce Emotional Exhaustion

Previous research has investigated expensive top-down interventions for burnout. A new study in the Academy of Management Journal proposes that encouraging employees to use self-reflective job titles can be a cost-effective alternative, as it has been found to effectively reduce emotional exhaustion through increasing self-verification and psychological safety.