Month: August 2014

Social Media at Work: Implications for Productivity

The use of social media at work is becoming increasingly common. A recent study done to develop a questionnaire for measuring good and bad social media behaviors revealed that, in addition to harmful social media behaviors being related to decreased performance, the beneficial behaviors seemed to have no significant relationship to performance. In short, no particular increase in performance output was detected.

Combating Stereotype Threat in the Workplace

Employees are often concerned that they are being judged or stereotyped based on their demographics, and their job performance and work attitudes are often negatively affected. This perceived stereotype threat may be eliminated if actively confronted by organizational leaders using training or affirmation, rather than being passively ignored and allowed to fester.

Teamwork- How Team Personality Influences Individual Behaviors

Teamwork is often an unavoidable necessity in most workplaces, and crucial for productivity and competitiveness. A new study examines how team personality traits such as extroversion and agreeableness ultimately influenced individuals’ helping behaviors. Groups who ranked high on extroversion seemed to adopt cooperative norms, which influenced individual behaviors, whereas agreeableness seemed to impact only individual helping.

How Corporate Social Performance Attracts Job Seekers

Corporate Social Performance is on the incline, and job seekers are increasingly starting to take notice. A new study examines how corporate social performance– including community involvement and pro-environmental efforts– can impact recruitment efforts and even make a company stand out among eager job seekers.

How to Conduct a Job Interview: Avoid the Sales Pitch

Job interviewers often have two goals in mind when meeting an applicant and conducting a job interview: Evaluate the candidate’s fit for the company or position, and “sell” the job to the prospective employee. A new study shows how this “selling orientation” negatively impacts interviewers’ judgment, suggesting a separation of the attraction and evaluation processes.