Tag: job performance

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Manager Personality Can Lead to Organization-Wide Performance

Even though I-O psychologists have made a pretty convincing case for selecting employees based on intelligence, the case for selecting employees based on personality is less clear, and oftentimes debated. If you’re not convinced yet, new research shows that manager personality may not only impact individual job performance, but may also impact a company’s bottom line. Will you jump on the personality bandwagon?

Intelligence Testing: Is It Always the Smartest Thing to Do?

We’ve all heard about the unparalleled ability to predict job success by using intelligence tests, but do they tell us everything we need to know? New research uses meta-analysis to explore whether intelligence can predict other kinds of work behavior that can make an organization sink or swim. They find that in some cases, personality testing actually comes out ahead.

Employee Sleepiness

Employee Sleepiness is Harmful for the Workplace

Sleepiness is what happens when people feel a strong biological urge to sleep. Unlike fatigue, which usually occurs when becoming exhausted by hard work, sleepiness has several different causes. These causes include poor sleep quantity (not getting enough sleep), poor sleep quality (waking up often while trying to sleep or

Organizational Socialization Tactics to Help Newcomers Adjust

Using Organizational Socialization Tactics to Help Newcomers Adjust

New research shows that certain organizational socialization tactics can help reduce newcomer anxiety and foster a greater sense of competence on the job. When socialization tactics enable the building of trusting relationships, organizations can facilitate greater organizational commitment among newcomers.

Social Media at Work: Implications for Productivity

The use of social media at work is becoming increasingly common. A recent study done to develop a questionnaire for measuring good and bad social media behaviors revealed that, in addition to harmful social media behaviors being related to decreased performance, the beneficial behaviors seemed to have no significant relationship to performance. In short, no particular increase in performance output was detected.