Month: October 2013

When Leaders Do Not Treat Employees Equally

You can’t like everyone. Even as a leader, it is difficult to treat all your employees equally. Some share your interests, have been with you for longer, or are just plain more likable. Others you don’t know as well or don’t like as much. It happens. But if you allow relationships with your subordinates to become too different from one another, job performance in your organization will suffer.

Getting the Benefits of Age Diversity in the Workplace

Conventional wisdom would tell you that age diversity in the workplace is a bad thing. It can be costly and leads to communication difficulties, as well as value conflicts. However, there are important benefits to an age diverse workforce that can strengthen your organization, provided work is structured in a way that allows creative solutions to business problems.

How Gender and Personality Contribute to the Wage Gap

Does it pay to be disagreeable? Well, if you are male, studies indicate that it does. A series of four studies show that both women and agreeable men suffer an income penalty unrelated to their job performance or other personality factors. In other words, the wage gap, so much discussed over the years, extends beyond women and affects men who don’t behave in stereotypically dominant and aggressive ways.

Idiosyncratic Deals: How work arrangements affect job performance

Flex-schedules, work from home, modified hours, alternate office locations – lately the news is full of debates as to whether or not idiosyncratic deals and atypical work arrangements really, well, work. A recent study suggests that not only do such idiosyncratic deals, or i-deals, work – they actually improve job performance and inspire employee gratitude.

Selection Tests and Job Performance

Does a candidate’s feelings about a company’s selection testing process affect their job performance, if hired? According to a new study, the answer to this question is: Yes. Does that mean you need to redesign your selection tests? Probably not. However, there are factors to be aware of when developing or administering a selection test.

Relationship Between Situational Demands and Job Performance

Most people are able to learn the situational demands of different environments and apply them appropriately. The job selection process, with its involved interviews and situational tests, is a peculiar and specialized kind of environment. New research suggests that an under-examined element that may come into play, not only during this part of the hiring process, but also in job performance generally.

What’s Missing from the Research on Work-Family Balance?

Research shows that human resource management departments that allow employees more flexible options to support their work-family balance create an environment of superior job performance and lower turnover. So why are more and more employers turning away from family friendly policies? The article suggest that, in part, the fault lies with the type of research being done.

The Downside to Monitoring Web-based Trainings

There are many reasons to monitor employees. Particularly when implementing relatively new technologies such as web-based trainings, it might seem wise to monitor not only employee skill acquisition, but also their efficiency completing the training, their internet activity, even the speed of their keystrokes. However, monitoring has a downside.