Month: March 2014

How a Structured Employment Interview Can Make a Difference

When structured properly, a job interview can help predict various aspects of employee performance even better than cognitive and personality tests. A new study examines how a Structured Employment Interview should be conducted for maximum benefit, suggesting pre-set questions and a set rating scale for responses.

A Climate for Inclusion & Diversity: Evidence that Being Inclusive Pays Off

Gender diversity in the workplace can fuel insight and creativity. But how do you avoid conflict? New research shows that department managers can maximize the advantages of gender diversity and minimize conflict by establishing a Climate for Inclusion, which means employees are treated fairly, valued, and allowed to weigh in on core decisions.

How Service Employees React to Mistreatment by Rude Customers

We’ve all seen employees in the service industry subjected to abusive behavior by rude customers. A new study by Ruodan Shao and Daniel P. Skarlicki finds that employees’ reactions to mistreatment by customers varies in individualistic and collectivistic cultures. It also suggests several solutions for dealing with the stress such rude treatment often causes.

How Positive Events Can Impact Work-Related Stress

Everyone knows that stress can cause health problems such as high blood pressure, depression, and exhaustion. But a new study found that positive events such as a compliment from a supervisor or achieving a work-related goal can go a long way toward improving employee health, suggesting that “positive intervention” can lead to less work-related stress.

Are You Promoting Work Engagement, or Workaholism?

There’s a fine line between work engagement and workaholism. The former can lead to positive, dedicated employees; the latter can lead to burnout, bad attitudes, and quitting. Youngkeun Choi examines the differences between the two, offering organizations guidance on encouraging work engagement and discouraging workaholism.