Tag: Counter-Productive Work Behavior

Being Fair

The Dark Side of Procedural Justice: When Being Fair Isn’t Enough

We tend to think that fairness in the workplace is always good, but new research has found a situation in which fairness can actually cause trouble between employees. In fact, it may be leading envious employees to act out in counter-productive ways. How does this happen, and how can organizations best prepare themselves to deal with the problem?

Intelligence Testing: Is It Always the Smartest Thing to Do?

We’ve all heard about the unparalleled ability to predict job success by using intelligence tests, but do they tell us everything we need to know? New research uses meta-analysis to explore whether intelligence can predict other kinds of work behavior that can make an organization sink or swim. They find that in some cases, personality testing actually comes out ahead.

Sleep Deprived Employees Engage in More Unethical Workplace Behavior

Sleep Deprived Employees Engage in More Unethical Workplace Behavior

So, how many cups of coffee have you had today? New research shows that ingesting caffeine actually makes it less likely that sleep deprived employees will behave unethically in the workplace. The study also uncovered the nefarious role played by co-workers acting unethically, and showed how they can make sleep deprived people do more bad things.

workplace bullying

Workplace Bullying: Corrupt and Harmful to Organizations

We tend to think of bullying as something that happens to kids at school, but a new review discusses the prevalence of workplace bullying, as well as its alarming harmful effects. Researchers are starting to consider bullying another form of organizational corruption.

Abusive Supervision may have Roots in Childhood

Abusive Supervision may have Roots in Childhood

Abusive supervision is a nasty common occurrence in the modern workplace. New research shows that supervisors are more likely to be abusive if they were exposed to family-related aggression as a child, especially if the supervisors are also “ruminators”. What can organizations do about it?

Is It Lonely At the Top? The Victimization of High Performers

High Performers are defined as the group of talented employees that typically increase both team and organizational performance. Past research has shown that High Performers are likely to be victimized in the workplace by other organizational members. A new study attempts to explain the victimization of High Performers by examining the role of envy and work group identification.

Social Media at Work: Implications for Productivity

The use of social media at work is becoming increasingly common. A recent study done to develop a questionnaire for measuring good and bad social media behaviors revealed that, in addition to harmful social media behaviors being related to decreased performance, the beneficial behaviors seemed to have no significant relationship to performance. In short, no particular increase in performance output was detected.

Will Being an Average Performer Prevent Employee Victimization?

Could an individual’s workplace performance determine whether or not they are subjected to employee victimization? A new study finds that both high and low performers may be victimized at work, but through different forms of aggressive behavior. Because future work performance may be impaired by such treatment, there is both an individual and organizational imperative to deal with this issue.