Month: June 2015

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Effective Negotiation: When Does Expressing Sadness Work?

Many popular books are written on how to succeed at high stakes negotiation, but researchers continue to study specific techniques to determine what really works. What about the emotion of sadness? If you need something from someone, are you more likely to get it if you let your lip tremble and solemnly wipe a tear from the corner of your eye? Or is that going to backfire?

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Organizational Newcomers: Conflict Can Lead to Worse Performance

When employees are new to an organization, they have a lot to learn. What are the policies and procedures? How should the work be done? Where is the coffee machine? But new research shows that newcomers who experience conflict with coworkers might not get all the information they need, ultimately hurting job performance. What can we do about it?

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Do Telecommuters Have Better Job Performance?

Are telecommuters better performers than their in-office counterparts? A new study examines the performance of telecommuters compared to their traditional office counterparts. Results show that in certain situations, telecommuting increases task performance and organizational citizenship behavior.

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Good Moods Encourage Speaking Up at Work

You have a wonderful idea about how to improve your workplace, but will you tell anybody about it? Sometimes speaking up is difficult to do. After all, you might be chastised or mocked for daring to challenge the status quo. New research shows that the mood of the potential listener may help determine whether or not you choose to speak up.

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Work-Family Conflict Changes How You Do Your Job

I’ll bet that if you have a job and also have a family, you probably have experienced work-family conflict. Work and family are both demanding and time-consuming, and there simply aren’t always enough hours in the day to satisfy the needs of both. New research shows that this pervasive type of conflict can affect the choices we make while at work, which can lead to career-altering outcomes.