Category: Job Performance

When Does Job Security Affect Job Performance?

Job security has become a recurring theme after the economic downturn. It seems that nobody is completely immune to the threat of layoffs. Have you ever wondered what this does to the productivity and effectiveness of employees? What can employers do to make sure that their employees don’t become discouraged in the face of job insecurity, and instead maintain good job performance?

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Goal Orientation: Helping Team Performance or My Own Performance?

We are the few, the proud, the performance-prove goal oriented! True, we have a slightly cumbersome name, but don’t let that fool you. We seek to achieve, to demonstrate our mastery, and to make sure everyone knows how much better than you we are. But starting today, we are on your work team. Will we help your team achieve success, or will we be too caught up in competing with you for personal glory?

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How to Survive Toxic Work Relationships by Thriving

Do you have a co-worker with whom interacting is draining? Have you ever worked with someone who was consistently aggravating, challenging, or rude? These types of relationships plague employees and organizations, and are even related to decreased job performance. However, de-energizing relationships can be managed and remedied, specifically through something psychologists call “thriving.”

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Organizational Newcomers: Conflict Can Lead to Worse Performance

When employees are new to an organization, they have a lot to learn. What are the policies and procedures? How should the work be done? Where is the coffee machine? But new research shows that newcomers who experience conflict with coworkers might not get all the information they need, ultimately hurting job performance. What can we do about it?

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Do Telecommuters Have Better Job Performance?

Are telecommuters better performers than their in-office counterparts? A new study examines the performance of telecommuters compared to their traditional office counterparts. Results show that in certain situations, telecommuting increases task performance and organizational citizenship behavior.

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Manager Personality Can Lead to Organization-Wide Performance

Even though I-O psychologists have made a pretty convincing case for selecting employees based on intelligence, the case for selecting employees based on personality is less clear, and oftentimes debated. If you’re not convinced yet, new research shows that manager personality may not only impact individual job performance, but may also impact a company’s bottom line. Will you jump on the personality bandwagon?

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Ethical Leadership Inspires Trust and Employee Success

Psychologists have identified a host of managerial styles that may result in positive organizational outcomes. But what is the role of ethical leadership? Is it even a real thing, or is it just some wishy-washy feel-good concept? Fortunately, a new study shows that ethical leadership is real, distinct, and can lead your employees and organization to success.

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What Does Job Security Have to Do With Organizational Citizenship Behavior?

My company is going through tough times and I’m afraid that I might lose my job. Will I be more or less likely to help the organization with extra effort? It’s an interesting question that has led to conflicting answers. However, new research sets the record straight. Is there a relationship between organizational citizenship behavior and job security?

Intelligence Testing: Is It Always the Smartest Thing to Do?

We’ve all heard about the unparalleled ability to predict job success by using intelligence tests, but do they tell us everything we need to know? New research uses meta-analysis to explore whether intelligence can predict other kinds of work behavior that can make an organization sink or swim. They find that in some cases, personality testing actually comes out ahead.

What Type of Happy Employees Can Benefit Organizations?

There has been a growing level of interest in the positive effect of happy employees on organizational outcomes, but the specific meaning of happiness is less clear. A recent article reviews four dimensions of happiness and suggests that the emotion-based dimension plays the most important role in predicting favorable organizational outcomes like job performance and employee retention.

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Employee Sleepiness is Harmful for the Workplace

Sleepiness is what happens when people feel a strong biological urge to sleep. Unlike fatigue, which usually occurs when becoming exhausted by hard work, sleepiness has several different causes. These causes include poor sleep quantity (not getting enough sleep), poor sleep quality (waking up often while trying to sleep or

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Back to the Drawing Board: Surviving Career Setbacks

Suddenly everything has gone wrong! Whether it’s a failed project or a failed career, workplace setbacks can derail even the most well-laid plans. What can employees do in response? A new article says determine the reason for failure, identify new goals, and seize the moment.

Organizational Socialization Tactics to Help Newcomers Adjust

Using Organizational Socialization Tactics to Help Newcomers Adjust

New research shows that certain organizational socialization tactics can help reduce newcomer anxiety and foster a greater sense of competence on the job. When socialization tactics enable the building of trusting relationships, organizations can facilitate greater organizational commitment among newcomers.

Social Media at Work: Implications for Productivity

The use of social media at work is becoming increasingly common. A recent study done to develop a questionnaire for measuring good and bad social media behaviors revealed that, in addition to harmful social media behaviors being related to decreased performance, the beneficial behaviors seemed to have no significant relationship to performance. In short, no particular increase in performance output was detected.

Successful Leadership for Virtual Teams: Strategies to Increase Performance

Virtual teams are becoming increasingly necessary as work teams interact across geographical lines and cultures. Established models of leadership are much harder in this context, but various solutions may help counter the difficulty of leadership for virtual teams. New research shows that shared leadership and supplemental structural supports may help enhance performance.

Employee Start Time: Does the Early Bird Get the Worm?

Most of the time, we assume that early morning individuals are perceived more positively than their late-rising counterparts due to being evaluated as more productive and responsible. A new study in the Journal of Applied Psychology specifically examines how employees’ start times relate to the perception of their work ethics and subsequent supervisor performance ratings.

Are You Managing and Keeping Your Star Performers?

In the evolving workforce of the 21st century, there is a tendency for star performers to produce a disproportionate amount of output compared to the average performer. Despite this trend there has been very little shift in how we treat and manage star performers, often treating and paying them the same as average performers. The result is higher turnover among stars. How important are star performers and what can we do to better manage and retain them?

Is More Status Inherently Better? Investigating Performance After Status Loss

Is having higher status always the best thing for greater performance outcomes? A new study examines how status loss affects the performance of both high and low status individuals. Researchers found that those with higher status are more likely to experience decreases in the quality of their performance, possibly due to the threat to their self-concept brought about by losing status.

Working Abroad- How to Help Employees Weather the Storm

Many employees are being sent on overseas assignments these days. Some start off working well in foreign cultures, but don’t maintain their adjustment levels over time, while others never perform as well as they did back home. A new study shows that initial motivation and psychological empowerment are crucial to the process, but interact with different kinds of stressors to affect performance in both positive and negative ways.

Will Being an Average Performer Prevent Employee Victimization?

Could an individual’s workplace performance determine whether or not they are subjected to employee victimization? A new study finds that both high and low performers may be victimized at work, but through different forms of aggressive behavior. Because future work performance may be impaired by such treatment, there is both an individual and organizational imperative to deal with this issue.

How to Create Successful Work Teams

Teamwork is essential to organizational success. But assembling a team that can work together effectively can make all the difference in whether a given project succeeds or fails. A new study suggests members’ individual needs play a significant role in intragroup conflict, and should be strongly considered when putting a work team together.

Make It Rain: How bad weather could be good for work productivity

When people think of rainy days, they tend to picture themselves lazing about, perhaps curled up on the sofa with a hot cup of coffee and a good book. But a new study suggests that bad weather may actually be good for workplace productivity, improving employee speed, accuracy and focus on task. The reason? There’s less distraction outside than there is on bright, sunny days.

Taking control back: Surviving an Abusive Supervisor

Abusive supervisors have become increasingly common in recent years, and can have a devastating effect on workplace morale and productivity. A new study examines how employees can maintain job performance while dealing with an abusive supervisor, and ultimately found that the individual’s personality has a more significant effect than their choice of coping strategy.

Thriving At Work Rather Than Just Going Through the Motions

Do you want to excel at what you do, instead of just going through the motions? A new study on thriving at work finds that employees who are more hopeful, efficacious, resilient, optimistic, and have supportive supervisors are more likely to succeed, which in turn is related to greater self-development and work performance.

A Climate for Inclusion & Diversity: Evidence that Being Inclusive Pays Off

Gender diversity in the workplace can fuel insight and creativity. But how do you avoid conflict? New research shows that department managers can maximize the advantages of gender diversity and minimize conflict by establishing a Climate for Inclusion, which means employees are treated fairly, valued, and allowed to weigh in on core decisions.

How to Increase Your Productivity: Setting Priorities

Everyone wants to be more productive, but no one has a time machine. When there aren’t enough hours in the day to do everything, how do you set priorities, so that you can increase your productivity without the quality of your work or life suffering? Could it be as simple as a new assessment that helps identify the low value tasks you perform every day?

When Leaders Do Not Treat Employees Equally

You can’t like everyone. Even as a leader, it is difficult to treat all your employees equally. Some share your interests, have been with you for longer, or are just plain more likable. Others you don’t know as well or don’t like as much. It happens. But if you allow relationships with your subordinates to become too different from one another, job performance in your organization will suffer.

Idiosyncratic Deals: How work arrangements affect job performance

Flex-schedules, work from home, modified hours, alternate office locations – lately the news is full of debates as to whether or not idiosyncratic deals and atypical work arrangements really, well, work. A recent study suggests that not only do such idiosyncratic deals, or i-deals, work – they actually improve job performance and inspire employee gratitude.

Selection Tests and Job Performance

Does a candidate’s feelings about a company’s selection testing process affect their job performance, if hired? According to a new study, the answer to this question is: Yes. Does that mean you need to redesign your selection tests? Probably not. However, there are factors to be aware of when developing or administering a selection test.

The Connection Between Self-Esteem and Job Satisfaction

Are you satisfied with your job? If not, the answer may be to look inward. This study includes an important note for employers regarding employee’s perception of success/failure. Fortunately, the right type of intervention may improve job satisfaction and ultimately job performance.

Effective Decision-Making: Why are Some Leaders Better at it than Others?

Effective decision-making is critical to successful leadership. However, not all decisions are created equal. Military leaders make their best decisions by taking into account the whole view of a situation, not just following rules or repeating past choices.

Does a Job Furlough Affect Performance?

We all have limited amount of stress and pressure we can take. Many studies have established the strain resulting from the threat to employees’ resources that layoffs or possible income losses represent. However, how do employees handle stress when a job furlough is what’s on the table, or when an employee has, in fact, been furloughed?

Stretch Goals: Careful Timing Required

We’ve all heard that boredom leads to employee turnover. Conventional wisdom says continuing to challenge your employees over time with difficult assignments and stretch goals is vital to keeping their engagement high. But what challenges are the right challenges? A new study indicates that treating all your employees the same way might be a serious mistake.

Job Performance – Predictors of Mood

The authors studies employees’ positive and negative emotions from concurrent appraisals of the immediate task situation and individual differences in performance goal orientation. Hypothesized relationships were significant regarding appraisals of task importance, and those high on performance goal orientation reacted to appraisals of task importance differently than those low on performance goal orientation.

Job Commitment and Performance (IO Psychology)

Job involvement is related to both in-role job performance and organizational citizenship behavior, according to an investigation by Aamir Ali Chughtai of Dublin City University. Job involvement relates to the employee’s level of commitment, in-role job performance refers to how well an employee performs the formal job requirements, and organizational

Bad Behavior At Work: Are Managers Asking For It? (IO Psychology)

Counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs) occur when employees do things that go against organizational goals. For example, stealing, bullying, unnecessary absence, swivel chair racing, beer pong in the break room, and assaulting the copy machine with a baseball bat when it is out of toner are all classified as counterproductive work behaviors.

When Customers Attack: Verbal Aggression and Employee Performance (IO Psychology)

Topic: Job Performance, Training, Conflict Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (SEPT 2012) Article: When Customers Exhibit Verbal Aggression, Employees Pay Cognitive Costs Authors: A. Rafaeli, A. Erez, S. Ravid, R. Derfler-Rozin, D.E. Treister, R. Scheyer Reviewed By: Ben Sher What happens when customers get angry? For starters, they may yell,

A new rating scale for multisource feedback (IO Psychology)

Topic: Feedback, Job Performance, Measurement Publication: Personnel Psychology (AUTUMN 2012) Article: Evidence for the effectiveness of an alternative multisource performance rating methodology Authors: B. J. Hoffman, C. A. Gorman, C. A. Blair, J. P. Meriac, B. Overstreet, & E. K. Atchley Reviewed by: Alexandra Rechlin Do you receive multisource feedback

Does Asking For Help Lead to High Performance? (IO Psychology)

Topic: Learning, Personality, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (MAR 2012) Article: The Impact of Help Seeking on Individual Task Performance: The Moderating Effect of Help Seekers’ Logics of Action Authors: D. Geller, P.A. Bamberger Reviewed By: Ben Sher Help, I need somebody! When employees get stuck trying to

The relationship between job performance and turnover – It’s not as simple as we thought! (IO Psychology)

Topic: Job Performance, Turnover, Culture Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JAN 2012) Article: The effect of culture on the curvilinear relationship between performance and turnover Authors: Michael C. Sturman, Lian Shao, & Jan H. Katz Reviewed by: Alexandra Rechlin The relationship between job performance and turnover has long been thought

Tips for Getting Tips (IO Psychology)

Topic: Job Performance, Personality, Training Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2011) Article: Want a Tip? Service Performance as a Function of Emotion Regulation and Extraversion Authors: N. Chi, A.A. Grandey, J.A. Diamond, K.R. Krimmel Reviewed By: Ben Sher Your restaurant server is quite the professional!  He manages a genuine,

Goals for Groups (IO Psychology)

Topic: Goals, Teams, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2011) Article: The Effect of Goal Setting on Group Performance: A Meta-Analysis Authors: A. Kleingeld, H. van Mierlo, L. Arends Reviewed By: Ben Sher He shoots, he scores! No, not those kind of goals. We’re talking about workplace goals—the

Thinking about Building the Box: Practical Intelligence & Entrepreneurs

Topic: Job Performance, Potential, Talent Management
Publication: Personnel Psychology (SUMMER 2011)
Article: The Practical Intelligence of Entrepreneurs: Antecedents and a Link With New Venture Growth
Authors: Baum, J. R., Bird, B. J., & Singh, S.
Reviewed By: Thaddeus Rada

Do We Have Organizational Support? Let’s Not Agree to Disagree

Topic: Teams, Job Performance
Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (MAY 2011)
Article: When Managers and Their Teams Disagree: A Longitudinal Look at the
Consequences of Differences in Perceptions of Organizational Support
Author: M.R. Bashshur, A. Hernandez, V. Gonzalez-Roma
Reviewed By: Ben Sher

One Plank at a Time: Building the Bridge from OCBs to Performance

Topic: Job Performance, Citizenship Behavior
Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology
Article: A Moderated Mediation Model of the Relationship Between Organizational
Citizenship Behaviors and Job Performance
Authors: Ozer, M.
Reviewed by: Neil Morelli

Using performance management practices to drive employee engagement

Topic: Engagement, Job Performance, Job Attitudes
Publication: Journal of Business and Psychology (JUN 2011)
Article: Performance management at the wheel: Driving employee engagement in organizations
Authors: Mone, E., Eisinger, C., Guggenheim, K., Price, B., Stine, C.
Reviewed by: Alexandra Rechlin

Employee engagement: Wild goose chase or golden egg?

Topic: Job Performance, Job Attitudes
Publication: Personnel Psychology (SPRING 2011)
Article: Work engagement: A quantitative review and test of its relations with task and
contextual performance
Authors: Christian, M.S. Garza, A.S., Slaughter, J.E.
Reviewer: Neil Morelli

Poker Face in Workplace: The Good, The Bad, and The…

Topic: Job Performance, Training
Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (MAR 2011)
Article: Service Without a Smile: Comparing the Consequences of Neutral and Positive Display Rules
Authors: J.P. Trougakos, C.L. Jackson, D.J. Beal
Reviewed By: Ben Sher

Time for Teamwork: When Aspects of Collectivism are Most Beneficial

Topic: Goals, Job Performance, Teams
Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (March, 2011)
Article: The power of “we”: effects of psychological collectivism on team
performance over time
Authors: Erich C. Dierdorff, Suzanne T. Bell, and James A. Belohlav
Reviewed By: Allison B. Siminovsky

Does Being Proactive in Your Job Positively Relate to Your Performance, Satisfaction, and Commitment? Yes, Yes, and Yes!

Topic: Job Performance, Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment, Job Attitudes
Publication: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology (JUNE 2010)
Article: Employee proactivity in organizations: A comparative meta-analysis of emergent proactive constructs
Authors: Jeffrey P. Thomas, Daniel S. Whitman, and Chockalingam Viswesvaran
Reviewed by: Mary Alice Crowe-Taylor

What Does Organizational Tenure Really Buy You?

Topic: Citizenship Behaviors, Counter-Productive Work Behavior, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Management (SEP) Article: Organizational tenure and job performance Authors: T.W.H. Ng and D.C. Feldman Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger It is often intuited that employees who remain in an organization longer gain more knowledge of their job and the organization and thus perform at a higher level than employees

Emotional Intelligence: A tangled web of definitions, predictors, outcomes, and models

Topic: Emotional Intelligence, Job Performance, Leadership
Publication: Industrial and Organizational Psychology: Perspectives on Science and Practice
Article: Emotional Intelligence: Toward Clarification of a Concept
Author: C. Cherniss
Selected commentary authors: Kaplan, Cortina, and Ruark (2010); Antonakis, J.& Dietz, J. (2010).
Reviewed by: Samantha Paustian-Underdahl

What Makes for a Successful Employee and Why?

Topic: Job Performance, Personality
Publication: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology (MAR 2010)
Article: Human capital and objective indicators of career success: The mediating effects of cognitive ability and conscientiousness
Authors: T.W.H. Ng and D.C. Feldman
Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger

Why Work Group Satisfaction Matters

Topic: Employee Satisfaction, Job Performance, Teams Publication: Personnel Psychology (SPRING 2010) Article: Satisfaction, citizenship behaviors, and performance in work units: A meta-analysis of collective construct relations Authors: D.S. Whitman, D.L. van Rooy, and C. Viswesvaran Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger The happy worker is the productive worker, right?  Not necessarily.  Indeed,

Predicting Job Performance with Implicit Words Games?

Topic: Personality, Measurement, Job Performance
Publication: Personnel Psychology (SPRING 2010)
Article: We (sometimes) know not how we feel: Predicting job performance with an implicit measure of trait affectivity
Authors: R.E. Johnson, A.L. Tolentino, O.B., Rodopman, and E. Cho
Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger

How Ethical Leadership Drives Performance

Topic: Ethics, Leadership, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Organizational Behavior (2010) Article: The relationship between ethical leadership and core job characteristics Authors: R.F. Piccolo, R. Greenbaum, D.N., Den Hartog, and R. Folger Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger It has long been thought that the characteristics of an employees’ job affects their motivation and

Can Personality Lead to Better Performance?

Topic: Motivation, Personality, Job Performance Publication: Personality and Individual Differences (MAR 2009) Article: Using a two-factor theory of achievement motivation to examine performance-based outcomes and self-regulatory processes. Authors: Story, P.A., Hart, J.W., Stasson, M.F., & Mahoney, J.M. Reviewed By: Samantha Paustian-Underdahl Have you ever wondered why some employees seem to find

SJTs: They’re Not Perfect, but Gosh Darn it they Work!

Topic: Selection Publication: Human Performance ( JAN 2010) Article: Contextual effects on SJT responses: An examination of construct validity and mean differences across applicant and incumbent contexts Authors: W.I. MacKenzie, R.E. Ployhart, J.A. Weekley, and C. Ehlers Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger A situational judgment test (SJT) is a commonly used employee

Do Optimistic Predictions Lead to Quicker Completion Times?

Topic: Goals, Job Performance, Judgment Publication: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (JAN 2010) Article: Finishing on time: When do predictions influence completion times? Authors: R. Buehler, J. Peetz, and D. Griffin Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger Past research has shown that human beings often underestimate the amount of time necessary for

Are Female Leaders Judged More Harshly than Male Leaders?

Topic: Leadership, Job Performance, Diversity Publication: Journal of Applied Social Psychology (APR 2009) Article: Is Transformational Leadership Always Perceived as Effective? Male Subordinates’ Devaluation of Female Transformational Leaders. Authors: Ayman, R., Korabik, K., and Morris, S. Reviewed By: Samantha Paustian-Underdahl Amongst researchers and practitioners, one of the most popular leadership styles

Leading Employees by Involving Them Leads to Results

Topic: Leadership, Job Performance, Citizenship Behavior Publication: Journal of Organizational Behavior (JAN 2010) Article: Does participative leadership enhance work performance by inducing empowerment or trust? The differential effects on managerial and non-managerial subordinates Authors: X. Huang, J. Iun, A. Liu, and Y. Gong Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger Isn’t it nice when

To Monitor or not to Monitor Emails: That is the Question

Topic: Job Performance Publication: Academy of Management Perspectives (NOV 2009) Article: Monitoring employee emails: Is there any room for privacy? Authors: W.P. Smith and F. Tabak Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger It’s hard to imagine work without email. For many employees, email is a necessity. One potential problem with email, however,

Do You Feel Like I Do?

Topic: Leadership, Job Performance Publication: The Leadership Quarterly (OCT 2009) Article: Do you feel what I feel? Mood contagion and leadership outcomes Authors: S.K. Johnson Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger Everyone wakes up on the wrong side of the bed from time-to-time – and leaders are certainly no exception. As a

Ladies and Gentlemen: The Invigorating Leadership/Job Performance Chain

Topic: Leadership, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (NOV 2009) Article: How leaders cultivate social capital and nurture employee vigor: Implications for job performance Authors: A. Carmeli, B. Ben-Hador, D.A., Waldman, and D.E. Rupp Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger One important characteristic of effective leaders is the ability to build

Mentoring: A Win-Win-Win Situation

Topic: Mentoring, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology (DEC 2009) Article: What can I gain as a mentor? The effect of mentoring on the job performance and social status of mentors in China Authors: D. Liu, J. Liu, H.K. Kwan, and Y. Mao Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger

After the Honeymoon: Supervisor support is still important

Topic: Job Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology (JUNE 2009) Article: Change in newcomers’ supervisor support and socialization outcomes after organizational entry Authors: M. Jokisaari, J. Nurmi Reviewed by: Larry Martinez Most organizational researchers know about the “Honeymoon Effect” – the notion that employees are on their best behavior in the months

Great Expectations: Catalyst for Employee Learning and Development

Topic: Job Performance, Leadership, Training Publication: Journal of Management (OCT 2009) Article: Pygmalion and employee learning: The role of leader behaviors Authors: X.M. Bezuijen, P.T. van den Berg, K. van Dam, and H. Thierry Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger Isn’t it fascinating how our expectations of others so frequently come to fruition?  The finding

So Many Constraints…Just Let Me to be Conscientious!

Topic: Job Performance, Personality Publication: Journal of Organizational Behavior (NOV 2009) Article: A meta-analytic investigation into the moderating effects of situational strength on the conscientiousness-performance relationship Authors: R.D. Meyer, R.S. Dalal and S. Bonaccio Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger Conscientiousness is a personality trait that predisposes employees to be well organized, attentive

Job Demands are to “I can’t” as Job Resources are to “I won’t”

Topic: Burnout, Job Analysis, Job Performance Publication: Journal of Organizational Behavior (OCT 2009) Article: How changes in job demands and resources predict burnout, work engagement, and sickness absenteeism Authors: W.B. Schaufeli, A.B. Bakker, W. Van Rhenen Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger There are many theories that explain the causes and effects of

Finding the Optimal Working Flow

Topic: Job Performance Publication: Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology (SEP 2009) Article: ‘Flow’ at work: An experience sampling approach Authors: C.J. Fullagar and E.K. Kelloway Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger Although many IO psychologists are concerned with negative work states and behaviors such as burnout, stress and strain, workplace accidents, and

How Can You Be So Rude!?

Topic: Job Performance, Work Environment, Culture Publication: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes (MAY 2009) Article: Overlooked but not untouched: How rudeness reduces onlookers’ on routine and creative tasks Authors: Porath, C. L. and Erez, A. Reviewed By: Benjamin Granger Now here’s a topic that might make you ball your

Effective Goals CAN Fly Under the Radar

Topic: Goals, Job Performance Publication: Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes Article: An exploratory field experiment of the effect of subconscious and conscious goals on employee performance. Author: A. Shantz, G.P. Latham Featured by: Benjamin Granger Do subconscious goals lead to improved employee performance? What exactly are subconscious goals?  Unlike conscious goals, employees are unaware of subconscious goals. When they become aware

Comparing Modes of Customer Service Communication

Topic: Job Performance Publication: Computers in Human Behavior Article: Human communication in customer-agent-computer interaction: Face-to-face versus over telephone .Author: A. Kira, D.M. Nichols, M. Apperley Featured by: Benjamin Granger Regarding consumer service, organizations strive for several outcomes: 1) The customer receives quality service, 2) the service is delivered in a timely manner, and

What to do about the Failure-Focused Employee

Topic: Job Performance, Motivation Publication: Human Performance Article: Failure avoidance motivation in a goal-setting situation. Author: S.R. Heimerdinger, V.B. Hinsz Featured by: Benjamin Granger Although it is known that employees who set specific and difficult goals tend to outperform those who set broad and relatively easy goals, different employees have differing motivational mindsets when they set their goals. Some employees are motivated to

Taking a Hard Line on Employee Lateness Can Pay Off!

Topic: Culture, Job Attitudes, Job Performance Publication: Human Performance Article:  Employee lateness behavior: the role of lateness climate and individuals lateness attitude.   Blogger: Benjamin Granger Many organizations go to great lengths to curtail employee lateness (showing up tardy for work) and for good reason – it can cost organizations billions of dollars in productivity a year. In

If I’m Bad, Then So Are You!

Topic: Feedback, Job Performance, Performance Appraisal Publication: International Journal of Selection and Assessment Article: The influence of a manager’s own performance appraisal on the evaluation of others. Blogger: Benjamin Granger Have you ever received a poor performance appraisal from a supervisor?  (Let’s hope not too many!)  If you have, were you surprised?  (Hey, I’m a pretty good employee! What

Where leaving it to Beaver meets the bottom line

Topic: Citizenship Behavior, Job Performance Publication: Human Performance Article: Test of Motowidlo et al.’s (1997) theory of individual differences in task and contextual performance. Blogger: James Grand A helpful hand here or a thoughtful “hi-how-are-ya” might be more valuable than we think. Psychologists are starting to realize that such dispositional characteristics can be meaningful predictors of on-the-job performance. Nearly 10 years ago, Motowidlo, Borman and Schmit proposed that performance at work was

Does Narcissism Lead to Ineffective Leadership? Depends on the Rater

Topic: Job Performance, Leadership, Personality Publication: Human Performance Article: Narcissism in Organizations: A multisource appraisal reflects different perspectives. Blogger: Benjamin Granger Organizational researchers have identified a personality trait that consistently relates to immoral and ineffective leadership: narcissism. Narcissism involves an exaggerated sense of self-worth (I’m better than everyone else!), a need for admiration and power (Everyone should look up to me!), and a tendency to exploit

Believe in yourself and someone just might drive a dump truck full of money to your house

Topic: Job Performance Publication: Journal of Applied Psychology Article: How the Rich (and Happy) Get Richer (and Happier): Relationship of Core Self-Evaluations to Trajectories in Attaining Work Success. Blogger: Rob Stilson OK, the scope of this article is beyond this blog (or perhaps the blogger), but I will give you the highlights and

Oh give me a BREAK!

Topic: Emotional Intelligence, Job Performance, Wellness Publication: Academy of Management Journal Article: Making the break count: An episodic examination of recovery activities, emotional experiences, and positive affect displays Blogger: LitDigger Do your customer service employees do work-like activities during their breaks or maybe even not take their breaks at all? If you care about

Hope…and Improved Job Performance?

Topic: Job Performance Publication: Journal of Organizational Behavior Article: Exploring the role of hope in job performance: Results from four studies. Blogger: Benjamin Granger Yeah sure, hope isn’t as common a concept in organizational research as job satisfaction or commitment, but Peterson and Byron (2008) found that hope does indeed play a role