Category: Job Performance

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Organizational Newcomers: Conflict Can Lead to Worse Performance

When employees are new to an organization, they have a lot to learn. What are the policies and procedures? How should the work be done? Where is the coffee machine? But new research shows that newcomers who experience conflict with coworkers might not get all the information they need, ultimately hurting job performance. What can we do about it?

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Do Telecommuters Have Better Job Performance?

Are telecommuters better performers than their in-office counterparts? A new study examines the performance of telecommuters compared to their traditional office counterparts. Results show that in certain situations, telecommuting increases task performance and organizational citizenship behavior.

Employee Sleepiness

Employee Sleepiness is Harmful for the Workplace

Sleepiness is what happens when people feel a strong biological urge to sleep. Unlike fatigue, which usually occurs when becoming exhausted by hard work, sleepiness has several different causes. These causes include poor sleep quantity (not getting enough sleep), poor sleep quality (waking up often while trying to sleep or

Organizational Socialization Tactics to Help Newcomers Adjust

Using Organizational Socialization Tactics to Help Newcomers Adjust

New research shows that certain organizational socialization tactics can help reduce newcomer anxiety and foster a greater sense of competence on the job. When socialization tactics enable the building of trusting relationships, organizations can facilitate greater organizational commitment among newcomers.

Social Media at Work: Implications for Productivity

The use of social media at work is becoming increasingly common. A recent study done to develop a questionnaire for measuring good and bad social media behaviors revealed that, in addition to harmful social media behaviors being related to decreased performance, the beneficial behaviors seemed to have no significant relationship to performance. In short, no particular increase in performance output was detected.

Employee Start Time: Does the Early Bird Get the Worm?

Most of the time, we assume that early morning individuals are perceived more positively than their late-rising counterparts due to being evaluated as more productive and responsible. A new study in the Journal of Applied Psychology specifically examines how employees’ start times relate to the perception of their work ethics and subsequent supervisor performance ratings.

Are You Managing and Keeping Your Star Performers?

In the evolving workforce of the 21st century, there is a tendency for star performers to produce a disproportionate amount of output compared to the average performer. Despite this trend there has been very little shift in how we treat and manage star performers, often treating and paying them the same as average performers. The result is higher turnover among stars. How important are star performers and what can we do to better manage and retain them?

Is More Status Inherently Better? Investigating Performance After Status Loss

Is having higher status always the best thing for greater performance outcomes? A new study examines how status loss affects the performance of both high and low status individuals. Researchers found that those with higher status are more likely to experience decreases in the quality of their performance, possibly due to the threat to their self-concept brought about by losing status.